SOLE CON­CERN

The Daily Telegraph - Travel - - SOLO TRAVEL - Nick Trend

HOW TO AVOID A SIN­GLE SUP­PLE­MENT

Sin­gle sup­ple­ments are one of the big­gest and most ex­pen­sive an­noy­ances for solo trav­ellers. But there are some ways which you can get around them. Here are a few strate­gies. In May and June and Septem­ber and Oc­to­ber, many ho­tels are qui­eter and more will­ing to of­fer bet­ter rates for sin­gle oc­cu­pancy. This is the time when you are most likely to find tour op­er­a­tors of­fer­ing tours and ho­tel stays with­out sup­ple­ments.

Book with an op­er­a­tor that spe­cialises in sin­gles hol­i­days

Some of those com­pa­nies – and cruises – spe­cialise in of­fer­ing hol­i­days for sin­gle trav­ellers. They may have a pol­icy of not charg­ing sup­ple­ments but of­fer a sin­gle or dou­ble room for sole oc­cu­pancy and price ac­cord­ingly. Note that that does not mean they are nec­es­sar­ily cheaper over­all than an op­er­a­tor which has a lower base price but adds a sup­ple­ment for sin­gles – so do com­pare prices be­fore book­ing.

Con­sider shar­ing a room

Some tour op­er­a­tors and cruise lines will of­fer to try to ar­range a shared room with another sin­gle trav­eller of the same sex. Al­ter­na­tively, you could try to find a trav­el­ling com­pan­ion through a spe­cial­ist sin­gles web­site.

Con­sider ad­ven­ture travel

Trips where most nights are spent camp­ing or in refuges, youth hos­tels or sim­ple lodges, and food is paid per per­son out of a kitty, are far less likely to charge sig­nif­i­cantly more for sin­gle book­ings.

5 Cut out the mid­dle man

Fi­nally, if you aren’t hav­ing any luck with tour op­er­a­tors, and if you are will­ing to book and travel in­de­pen­dently, try con­tact­ing the ho­tel by phone or email to ne­go­ti­ate the best pos­si­ble rate for a sin­gle room or sin­gle oc­cu­pancy.

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