Pc who called in sick was spot­ted on TV cel­e­brat­ing a win at Royal As­cot

The Daily Telegraph - - News - By Danny Boyle

A PO­LICE­MAN was caught “throw­ing a sickie” when he ap­peared on tele­vi­sion cel­e­brat­ing a win at Royal As­cot, a tri­bunal has heard.

Pc Jonathan Adams said he was too ill to go to work, only to at­tend the race­course – and ap­pear on Chan­nel 4 Rac­ing “jump­ing around” af­ter Quiet Re­flec­tion, a horse he part owns, won the Com­mon­wealth Cup.

The pro­ba­tion­ary of­fi­cer is ac­cused of call­ing in sick on three oc­ca­sions to at­tend horse rac­ing. He faces three al­le­ga­tions of gross mis­con­duct un­der “hon­esty and in­tegrity” and, if found proven, he could be dis­missed from Glouces­ter­shire Po­lice.

Pc Adams claimed that he was ill on the days he went to the races, but found at­tend­ing the meet­ings “gen­uinely ther­a­peu­tic and helped him cope with stress and de­pres­sion”.

Stephen Mor­ley, pre­sent­ing the case for the force, told the hear­ing: “On three oc­ca­sions he de­lib­er­ately re­ported sick in or­der to go to the races. There is no dis­pute that he re­ported sick and there is no dis­pute that he did go to the races. Pc Adams says he found that go­ing to the rac­ing was a good cop­ing mech­a­nism and made him feel bet­ter. We do not ac­cept he was sick at all. He was throw­ing a sickie.”

Mr Mor­ley told the three-per­son panel that on Septem­ber 30 2015, Pc Adams re­ported he was suf­fer­ing from sick­ness or di­ar­rhoea but in­stead went to Not­ting­ham. On April 6 2016, Pc Adams re­ported he had a mi­graine and again went to Not­ting­ham race­course. Pc Adams had then re­quested June 14 to 20 as an­nual leave, but it was re­jected. On June 17, Pc Adams re­ported he was too ill to work be­cause of ir­ri­ta­ble bowel syn­drome. In­stead he went to Royal As­cot where Quiet Re­flec­tion won the Com­mon­wealth Cup.

The panel watched a 10-sec­ond clip from Chan­nel 4 Rac­ing show­ing Pc Adams jump­ing around and cel­e­brat­ing Quiet Re­flec­tion’s win.

When Pc Adams was in­ter­viewed, he said he was ill on the days he went to the races.

“He said that he found at­tend­ing race meet­ings was gen­uinely ther­a­peu­tic and helped him cope with stress and de­pres­sion,” Mr Mor­ley said.

Richard Shep­herd, rep­re­sent­ing Pc Adams, said the of­fi­cer was of “im­pec­ca­ble char­ac­ter”.

“Pc Adams did his best to man­age his symp­toms. There is noth­ing dis­hon­est about that. There may be fail­ings but it’s not dis­hon­est,” he said.

“He has a stress-re­lated con­di­tion, ag­gra­vated by his work­place, and he tried to al­le­vi­ate that by his affin­ity and close­ness to horses.”

The hear­ing con­tin­ues.

The mo­ment Pc Adams, above, cel­e­brated af­ter Quiet Re­flec­tion, a horse he part owns, won the Com­mon­wealth Cup at Royal As­cot

Pc Jonathan Adams, left, faces al­le­ga­tions of gross mis­con­duct af­ter tak­ing days off sick and go­ing to the races

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