SIM­PLY THE REST IT’S SHAB­BAT UK

JC read­ers re­veal how they will be spend­ing to­mor­row’s na­tional cel­e­bra­tion

The Jewish Chronicle - - FRONT PAGE - IN­TER­VIEWS BY SANDY RASHTY AND NAOMI FIRSHT

Elaine and Adam Tarsh, mem­bers of Radlett Syn­a­gogue

Mrs Tarsh said: “We’re both go­ing to the Chal­lah Make and we’re also plan­ning to at­tend a Fri­day night meal for 10 fam­i­lies in Radlett.”

Mr Tarsh said: “One of our friends is host­ing the meal but ev­ery­one else has pitched in and is pro­vid­ing one or more el­e­ments of the meal — chicken soup, chicken, chal­lot, wine, whisky, hot plates, fruit, choco­late, shab­bos urns, soup — every­thing is be­ing looked af­ter.

“We’ve also asked a few peo­ple to pre­pare a d’var To­rah for the ta­ble and oth­ers to lead the singing. It should be a noisy evening.”

Aish rabbi Shlomo Farhi

“I run Chazak, an ini­tia­tive for Bri­tish Sephardis. We’ll be hold­ing an event for 150 young pro­fes­sion­als this week­end.

“Shab­bat is spe­cial. It re­minds me that even though some­times the Jewish com­mu­nity may have dif­fer­ent opin­ions and back­grounds, they can and do come to­gether in the most beau­ti­ful way.”

Stan­more Syn­a­gogue mem­ber Judy

Singer, 70

“I’m go­ing to a spe­cial com­mu­nal lunch. I at­tend shul reg­u­larly and en­joy catch­ing up with friends within the com­mu­nity.

“Shab­bat means switch­ing off from the daily rou­tine and pres­sures, en­joy­ing be­ing with fam­ily and friends and re­lax­ing with a book and the pa­pers.” Rabbi Yossi Bo­den­heim, stu­dent chap­lain for Scot­land and as­sis­tant rabbi at Giffnock Syn­a­gogue, Glas­gow

“We’ve had a chal­lah bake in Ed­in­burgh with JSoc on Tues­day, and a chal­lah bake in Glas­gow on Wed­nes­day for over 100 peo­ple.

“For Fri­day night din­ner at Giffnock Syn­a­gogue we’re ex­pect­ing 150 peo­ple and around 15 stu­dents.

“Shab­bat ’s about hav­ing meals with my chil­dren and fam­ily, and stu­dents. In Scot­land what stu­dents love most is Fri­day night din­ner. Singing around the ta­ble and ruach is a big part of it.”

Sarah and Neil Clarke, mem­bers of Bore­ham­wood and El­stree Syn­a­gogue

“We’ll be at­tend­ing the com­mu­nal can­dle light­ing, ser­vice and din­ner run by the shul on the Fri­day night and we are go­ing round to friends for Shab­bat lunch.

“Shab­bat is a time to stop. With­out the dis­trac­tions of mod­ern life, we have time to ap­pre­ci­ate every­thing we have. Our son loves shul and the chil- dren’s ser­vice (and kid­dush) and it is lovely to see him pos­i­tively em­brac­ing his Ju­daism.”

Avrahum Sanger, 21, stu­dent in Lon­don

“I’ll be either help­ing out at a com­mu­nity cel­e­bra­tion or go­ing to a stu­dents UJS/Chap­laincy Shab­bat UK din­ner.

“It’s all about switch­ing off from the week.”

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