The power of love

BRYAN CRANSTON finds him­self trans­formed by an alien at­tack in the fi­nal episode of elec­tric dreams

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elec­tric Dreams

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FOL­LOW­ING FIVE FAN­TAS­TI­CAL episodes, this week’s in­stal­ment of Elec­tric Dreams is a much ‘qui­eter and more sim­ple’ tale, ac­cord­ing to its star Bryan Cranston.

‘It’s re­ally sweet, and small in scope com­pared to the oth­ers, but that’s why I was at­tracted to it,’ says the Break­ing

Bad ac­tor, who also serves as ex­ec­u­tive pro­ducer on the sci-fi an­thol­ogy.

‘It ex­am­ines the con­di­tion of what makes us hu­man and looks at the old­est of emo­tions – love.’

ALIEN AT­TACK

Adapted by Stranger

Things writer Jes­sica

Meck­len­burg, Hu­man

Is is based on Philip K.

Dick’s 1955 short story and fol­lows a cold, emo­tion­ally abu­sive hus­band, Silas Her­rick

(Cranston), and his sad, dis­con­nected wife,

Vera (Essie Davis).

Both work for Gen­eral Olin

(Liam Cun­ning­ham) at the

In­ter­ga­lac­tic In­tel­li­gence Agency. As part of their mis­sion to pro­tect the planet of Terra, for­merly known as Earth, Silas is sent to col­lect valu­able re­sources from a planet called Rexor IV, where his team comes un­der at­tack from vi­cious aliens.

Mirac­u­lously, Silas es­capes, but the heart­less hus­band re­turns home a changed man. Now des­per­ately in love with his wife, could this be the same sniv­el­ling Silas who left for Rexor IV?

‘I’m play­ing a man who’s done with his re­la­tion­ship,’ says Cranston, 61, ‘and then as some­one who sees his wife in a new light. But from Vera’s point of view, you’ll see a woman who emo­tion­ally risks her­self in or­der to find love, and as we know, love is any­thing but sim­ple.’

The episode marks the end of the cur­rent run of Elec­tric Dreams, but there are four more episodes due to air next year, with Juno Tem­ple, Greg Kin­n­ear and Vera Farmiga among the cast list.

‘It’s been one of the most dif­fi­cult things I’ve been in­volved with in my ca­reer,’ says Cranston. ‘We’ve had 10 dif­fer­ent writ­ers, direc­tors and lo­ca­tions in the UK and US, plus a mas­sive amount of cast and crew. Ev­ery­thing has been mul­ti­plied.’

A WORLD OF POS­SI­BIL­I­TIES

But surely the bonus of be­ing ex­ec­u­tive pro­ducer meant Cranston could cherry-pick the role he liked the most?

‘Yes, I got to do that,’ he smiles.

‘But I wanted to choose some­thing ap­pro­pri­ate for my age, so I had to wait and see what the writ­ers came up with be­cause al­though we used Philip K. Dick’s ma­te­rial as a spring­board, we told them to change what­ever they wanted – char­ac­ters, set­tings, lan­guages – as long as they kept the core idea and con­nected it to mod­ern-day life.

‘But if you look at any movies based on Dick’s work, whether it’s The Ad­just­ment

Bu­reau, Blade Run­ner or To­tal Re­call, you will al­ways find hu­man be­ings at the core. ‘Yes, there are fu­tur­is­tic no­tions, but it all boils down to hu­man be­ings and our re­la­tion­ships with each other.’

HU­MAN IS SEES CRANSTON’S HER­RICK UN­DERGO AN EPIPHANY CRANSTON STARRED IN BREAK­ING BAD

SILAS HER­RICK (BRYAN CRANSTON) HAS A VI­TAL MIS­SION

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