WWI medal in­for­ma­tion card

Most who served abroad in WW1 were en­ti­tled to at least one medal. There should be a medal in­for­ma­tion card on TNA web­site of An­ces­try and at least one medal roll (with more de­tail on) for each sol­dier

Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine - - ARMY ANCESTORS -

1 SUR­NAME AND GIVEN NAMES

Not all de­clared mid­dle names on en­list­ment so these are some­times miss­ing (or for of­fi­cers there are of­ten just ini­tials).

2 CORPS

( Reg­i­ments served in, in date or­der, ear­li­est at top). Many sol­diers changed reg­i­ments, some­times sev­eral times, dur­ing the First World War.

3 RANKS HELD IN EACH REG­I­MENT

This man is just a pri­vate, but many were pro­moted or com­mis­sioned (made an of­fi­cer) which would be shown here.

4 MEDAL EN­TI­TLE­MENTS

The Star means the 1914 Star or 1914/15 Star de­pend­ing on when / where the sol­dier first went abroad. A man with a Star should also have the Vic­tory and Bri­tish War Medal (but if he went abroad in 1916 or later only the Vic­tory and BWM). SWB (Sil­ver War Badge) means a man was dis­charged wounded or un­fit.

5 THEATRE OF WAR

Num­ber 1 is France & Bel­gium. TNA lists other fronts (na­tion­alarchives. gov.uk/help-with-your-re­search/ re­search-guides/bri­tish-armymedal-in­dex-cards-1914-1920/).

6 RE­MARKS

This is un­usual: Pri­vate Smith’s medals were for­feit as he was shot for de­ser­tion. More of­ten you’ll find ‘KIA’ (Killed in ac­tion) or ‘POW’ ( Pris­oner of War).

2 1 6 4 5 3

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