Pe­traeus’ mis­tress won’t face charges of cy­ber stalk­ing

cIa dI­rec­tor scan­dal U.S. at­tor­ney rules out cy­ber stalk­ing charges over emails.

Austin American-Statesman - - FRONT PAGE - By Kim­berly Dozier

The Jus­tice De­part­ment de­cides not to charge David Pe­traeus’ mis­tress, Paula Broad­well, with cy­ber stalk­ing as part of its in­ves­ti­ga­tion into an email scan­dal that led to the res­ig­na­tion of the CIA di­rec­tor.

WASHINGTON — The Jus­tice De­part­ment has de­cided not to charge David Pe­traeus’ mis­tress, Paula Broad­well, with cy­ber stalk­ing as part of its in­ves­ti­ga­tion into an email scan­dal that led to the res­ig­na­tion of the CIA di­rec­tor and sto­ried gen­eral.

Broad­well’s lawyer, Robert Muse, gave the me­dia a let­ter from U.S. At­tor­ney Robert O’Neill that said no fed­eral charges will be brought in Florida re­lated to “al­leged acts of cy­ber stalk­ing.”

Pe­traeus re­signed as CIA di­rec­tor in Novem­ber af­ter ac­knowl­edg­ing the ex­tra­mar­i­tal af­fair, which was ex­posed af­ter Broad­well emailed Tampa so­cialite Jill Kel­ley, al­legedly warn­ing Kel­ley to stay away from Pe­traeus and Gen. John Allen, the U.S. com­man­der in Afghanistan.

Kel­ley re­ported the emails to the FBI, trig­ger­ing an in­ves­ti­ga­tion that led the FBI to Kel­ley’s emails to the mar­ried Allen, who is now un­der in­ves­ti­ga­tion by the Pen­tagon’s in­spec­tor gen­eral.

“The de­ci­sion on whether to bring a pros­e­cu­tion is al­ways a se­ri­ous mat­ter, and one that should never be un­der­taken with­out the most thought­ful de­lib­er­a­tion,” said Jus­tice De­part­ment spokesman Wil­liam C. Daniels. “Af­ter ap­ply­ing rel­e­vant case law to the par­tic­u­lar facts of this case, the United States At­tor­ney’s Of­fice for the Mid­dle District of Florida has de­cided not to pur­sue a fed­eral case re­gard­ing the al­leged acts of ‘cy­ber-stalk­ing’ in­volv­ing Paula Broad­well.”

A spokesman for Broad­well says she and her fam­ily are “pleased with this de­ci­sion and pleased that this is re­solved.”

Her at­tor­ney has not been no­ti­fied that she is the sub­ject or tar­get of any other Jus­tice De­part­ment in­ves­ti­ga­tion.

Broad­well, Pe­traeus’ bi­og­ra­pher and a re­serve Army of­fi­cer, is still be­ing in­ves­ti­gated by the Pen­tagon for al­legedly mis­han­dling clas­si­fied in­for­ma­tion. FBI in­ves­ti­ga­tors found a “sub­stan­tial amount” of ma­te­rial marked clas­si­fied at her home.

The doc­u­ments were part of her re­search from her trips to in­ter­view Pe­traeus and his com­man­ders across Afghanistan for her best-sell­ing book on Pe­traeus, “All In.”

Pe­traeus told friends he had never given clas­si­fied in­for­ma­tion to Broad­well, and she said she didn’t re­ceive such ma­te­rial from Pe­traeus.

Pe­traeus and Broad­well say their ro­man­tic re­la­tion­ship be­gan only af­ter he re­tired from the mil­i­tary and started at the CIA.

Both are mar­ried — Pe­traeus, 60, to his wife of 38 years, Holly Knowl­ton Pe­traeus, and Broad­well, 40, to hus­band Scott Broad­well. The Broad­wells have two young chil­dren.

Pe­traeus and Broad­well have both ex­pressed re­gret for the af­fair, which they say ended this sum­mer.

The CIA is in­ves­ti­gat­ing Pe­traeus’ con­duct to ex­am­ine whether he may have used CIA re­sources to fur­ther the af­fair.

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