Un­wa­ver­ing NRA con­tin­ues to op­pose all gun re­stric­tions

NRA chief says only armed guards, po­lice would make schools safer.

Austin American-Statesman - - FRONT PAGE - By Kevin Freking

The Na­tional Ri­fle As­so­ci­a­tion said not a sin­gle new gun reg­u­la­tion will make chil­dren safer and that a White House task force on gun vi­o­lence may try to un­der­mine the Sec­ond Amend­ment.

WASHINGTON — An un­wa­ver­ing Na­tional Ri­fle As­so­ci­a­tion said Sun­day that not a sin­gle new gun reg­u­la­tion would make chil­dren safer, that “a me­dia ma­chine” rel­ishes blam­ing the gun in­dus­try for each new at­tack like the one that oc­curred at a Con­necti­cut ele­men­tary school, and that a White House task force on gun vi­o­lence may try to un­der­mine the Sec­ond Amend­ment.

“Look, a gun is a tool. The prob­lem is the crim­i­nal,” said Wayne LaPierre, the CEO of the na­tion’s largest gun-rights lobby, in a na­tion­ally broad­cast tele­vi­sion in­ter­view.

‘If it’s crazy to call for putting po­lice and armed se­cu­rity in our schools to pro­tect our chil­dren, then call me crazy.’

Wayne LaPierre,

CEO of the Na­tional Ri­fle As­so­ci­a­tion

LaPierre hardly backed down from his com­ments Fri­day, when the NRA broke its week­long si­lence on the shoot­ing ram­page at Sandy Hook Ele­men­tary School in New­town, Conn.

LaPierre’s as­ser­tion that guns and po­lice of­fi­cers in all schools are what will stop the next killer drew wide­spread scorn, and even some NRA sup­port­ers in Congress are pub­licly dis­agree­ing with the pro­posal.

Rep. Chris Murphy, DConn., called it “the most re­volt­ing, tone deaf state­ment I’ve ever seen.” A head­line from the New York Post sum­ma­rized LaPierre’s ini­tial pre­sen­ta­tion be­fore re­porters with the head­line: “Gun Nut! NRA loon in bizarre rant over New­town.”

LaPierre told NBC’s “Meet the Press” on Sun­day that only those armed guards and po­lice would make kids safe.

“If it’s crazy to call for putting po­lice and armed se­cu­rity in our schools to pro­tect our chil­dren, then call me crazy,” LaPierre said. “I think the Amer­i­can peo­ple think it’s crazy not to do it.”

He asked Congress for money to put a po­lice of­fi­cer in ev­ery school. He also said the NRA would co­ordi- nate a na­tional ef­fort to put former mil­i­tary and po­lice of­fi­cers in schools as vol­un­teer guards. The NRA leader dis­missed ef­forts to re­vive the as­sault weapons ban as a “phony piece of leg­is­la­tion” that’s built on lies. He made clear it was highly un­likely that the NRA could sup­port any new gun reg­u­la­tions.

Some law­mak­ers were in­cred­u­lous, yet ac­knowl­edged that the po­lit­i­cal and fundrais­ing might of the NRA would make Pres­i­dent Barack Obama’s push for gun re­stric­tions a strug­gle.

“I have found the state­ments by the NRA over the last cou­ple of days to be really dis­heart­en­ing, be­cause the state­ments seem to not re­flect any un­der­stand­ing about the slaugh­ter of chil­dren” in New­town, said Sen. Joe Lieber­man, a Con­necti­cut in­de­pen­dent.

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