Fit City: In­spir­ing words that get us to the fin­ish

Heart­felt cheers, teas­ing jeers pay off at race fin­ish line.

Austin American-Statesman - - FRONT PAGE - Pam LeBlanc In­spi­ra­tion

“A com­peti­tor and team­mates said I had a fat (butt) on the start line. I spent the whole race thwart­ing their en­tire team and beat­ing them at the fin­ish.”

— Bob McGhee “My hus­band — with tears in his eyes and a break in his voice — telling me how proud he was of me. I think I could have kept go­ing for days on that one ...” — Mary Beth Saenz, seen here in blue. She was the last fin­isher in Jack’s Generic Triathlon. Her hus­band, in red, had al­ready fin­ished the race but went back to cross with her.

CONTRIBUTED BY KREUTZ PHO­TOG­RA­PHY

Some­times, you just can’t do it alone.

You might re­al­ize it at mile 20 of a marathon, or with a daunt­ing hill loom­ing just ahead dur­ing a 100-mile bi­cy­cle ride. You might feel like reach­ing for a Sty­ro­foam noo­dle mid­way through an open-water swim, or ques­tion your san­ity while tug­ging on your cy­cling shoes dur­ing a triathlon.

Then, just when you’re ready to buckle, some­one — your best friend, hus­band or a to­tal stranger — says some­thing that pulls you out of the gut­ter. You fight to the fin­ish. With­out them, you never would have made it.

We asked read­ers to share the most in­spir­ing thing any­one ever said to get them through a gru­el­ing event. From the high school track coach who ad­vised his team to “Run your own race” to the guy who yelled “The free pizza tent is al­most out,” we loved what we heard.

Here, we share some of our fa­vorite re­sponses.

Next time you think you just can’t turn the ped­als one more time, when you’d rather sit down on the curb and take off your shoes than keep run­ning, re­mem­ber th­ese words.

They just might get you to the fin­ish line.

“My hus­band — with tears in his eyes and a break in his voice — telling me how proud he was of me. I think I could have kept go­ing for days on that one ...” — Mary Beth Saenz

“A com­peti­tor and team­mates said I had a fat (butt) on the start line. I spent the whole race thwart­ing their en­tire team and beat­ing them at the fin­ish.” — Bob McGhee

“A stranger started to pass me at mile 25 of the Chicago

NER / AMER­I­CAN-STATES­MAN

Diana Welsch cheers for the run­ners along En­field Road dur­ing The 2010 States­man Capi­tol 10,000. JAY JAN-

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.