Re­model your clas­sic kitchen with a mod­ern twist

This kitchen un­der­goes a re­model that main­tains its clas­sic style but with a mod­ern twist.

Cottages & Bungalows - - Contents - BY KRISTIN DOWDING PHO­TOG­RA­PHY BY BRET GUM STYLING BY JICKIE TOR­RES

It can be a chal­lenge to blend a new aes­thetic with the ex­ist­ing style when up­dat­ing the kitchen of an older home. With this re­model in La Jolla, Cal­i­for­nia, se­nior in­te­rior de­signer Ta­tiana Machado-Rosas of Jack­son De­sign and Re­mod­el­ing needed to mod­ern­ize func­tion­al­ity while keep­ing the spirit of the ar­chi­tec­ture in­tact. “The home­owner wanted East Coast tra­di­tional with a twist,” she says. “She didn’t want a grandma’s kitchen, but wanted it to fol­low the ar­chi­tec­ture of the home. The re­sult was so­phis­ti­cated and el­e­gant with some el­e­ments of con­tem­po­rary.”

“You can’t have a con­tem­po­rary kitchen when the rest of the house is tra­di­tional. It comes down to se­lect­ing the right de­sign el­e­ments.”

STOR­AGE SPACE

The house was built in 1939, and the kitchen’s last re­model was in the ’80s, so it was cramped, out­dated and didn’t use space to its ad­van­tage. “It wasn’t that func­tional, and the stor­age wasn’t that con­ve­nient,” says Ta­tiana. “There were things she couldn’t use, be­cause they were tucked in a cor­ner out of reach.”Their plan was to open up the space, make it more func­tional and add a more mod­ern ap­pear­ance, while keep­ing with the home’s over­all tra­di­tional style. But they had a few chal­lenges to over­come along the way.

OVER THE HILL

The big­gest is­sue in the kitchen was a lack of wall and stor­age space. “One wall is made up al­most en­tirely of win­dows, an­other has doors, and then there’s the open­ing to the break­fast nook, so there wasn’t a lot of wall space for cab­i­netry or stor­age,” says Ta­tiana. To com­pen­sate, they had to get cre­ative with ap­pli­ance place­ment and ended up in­stalling ap­pli­ances on one side of the is­land and cre­at­ing a cus­tom pantry flank­ing the re­frig­er­a­tor for ex­tra stor­age. What re­frig­er­a­tor? you

The kitchen al­ready had large win­dows to let in nat­u­ral light, but ev­ery­thing else in the kitchen was stripped and re­placed for bet­ter or­ga­ni­za­tion and func­tion and a more

mod­ern aes­thetic. New oak floors were stained to match the floor­ing through­out

the rest of the home.

OP­PO­SITE| The wrought-iron leaded-glass de­sign was “a way to bring the tra­di­tional look with­out be­ing too or­nate,” says Ta­tiana. It adds a tra­di­tional flair, and mixes well with the new mod­ern setup. The

back­splash above the stove achieves the same out­come, bring­ing a more elab­o­rate

de­sign and tex­ture into the mix.

A cus­tom cab­i­net hides the re­frig­er­a­tor, while added cup­boards and draw­ers pro­vide ex­tra stor­age for food. The unit looks like a chic pantry, con­ceal­ing what can eas­ily be an eye­sore. “We used a navy-blue stain on wal­nut, but note that the stain will ab­sorb dif­fer­ently on dif­fer­ent woods,” says Ta­tiana.

The new coun­ter­tops are made of Pen­talQuartz, which has vein­ing to look like Cala­catta mar­ble, but it’s a more cost-ef­fec­tive op­tion that will last. The mini sub­way tile is made of Car­rara mar­ble and of­fers fresh, un­der­stated tex­ture to the mostly white room.

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