Land­ing a job after cer­ti­fi­ca­tion

Daily Freeman (Kingston, NY) - - YOUR DAILY BREAK - An­nie Lane

A year ago, I signed up to do a shad­ow­ing cer­ti­fi­ca­tion course at a day care fa­cil­ity. Shad­ow­ing in­volves work­ing as an as­sis­tant to a child with lowor high-func­tion­ing autism. “John,” the in­struc­tor of the course, led me to be­lieve that there would be a job place­ment at the end of the train­ing. How­ever, after sev­eral months of fol­low­ing up with him, I was still un­able to find a job as a shadow, de­spite the fact that I had spent hun­dreds of dol­lars and many hours of time to fin­ish the train­ing.

When­ever I’ve tried to con­tact him about find­ing me a job, he has al­ways made an ex­cuse of hav­ing a per­sonal fam­ily tragedy, and when I con­tacted him two months ago, he told me that he had been di­ag­nosed with Hodgkin lym­phoma, that he had lost his con­do­minium and that his lap­top had fallen in a lake. I would be in­clined to be­lieve John, but he ex­hibits many symp­toms of a patho­log­i­cal liar. He told me he would re­fund me the money I spent on the train­ing, yet ev­ery time I con­tact him, he uses his di­ag­no­sis as an ex­cuse for not help­ing me, even though he said he wouldn’t do that. I would pur­sue le­gal ac­tion against John if I had the money, but I just want a straight an­swer out of him for why he scammed me like this. I’ve sent him text mes­sages, which he has not an­swered. I have not phoned him, be­cause I don’t want to talk to him on the phone. I did not do this train­ing for fun; I did it to find work, and I could not find this job my­self with­out con­nec­tions. I do not know whether John re­ally has cancer or not, but I feel scammed and would like to know what I could do about it. — Feel­ing Scammed in

Mon­treal

It sounds as if the only course John should be teach­ing is im­prov act­ing. I hate to say it, but I think he’s a dead-end in your job search.

Nev­er­the­less, was the cer­ti­fi­ca­tion you re­ceived le­git­i­mate? If so, I wouldn’t con­sider it a waste of money. That train­ing could still land you a job. If the day care fa­cil­ity where you shad­owed is still op­er­a­tional, why not go di­rectly to man­age­ment? You can also look else­where for po­si­tions that would al­low you to work with chil­dren with autism. Just present your ex­pe­ri­ence in the best pos­si­ble light when ap­ply­ing; no need to men­tion scam­mers or lap­tops in lakes. Good luck.

Please weigh in on peo­ple who work in pub­lic places ad­dress­ing se­nior cit­i­zens by “honey,” “sweetie” and other such terms. Isn’t this a form of se­nior bul­ly­ing? Your in­put on this sub­ject would be ap­pre­ci­ated, as I find this prac­tice un­ac­cept­able. — Se­nior in Con­necti­cut

It’s all in the tone. Yes, it can be de­mean­ing and rude to call some­one “sweetie” or “honey.” But those are also terms of en­dear­ment. So try to take into ac­count the speaker’s in­ten­tion.

Even so, I un­der­stand why you might be of­fended. So if you don’t like it, just po­litely tell the peo­ple, “My name is ac­tu­ally (Mr. or Mrs. X).” That will set them straight.

If the day care fa­cil­ity where you shad­owed is still op­er­a­tional, why not go di­rectly to man­age­ment? You can also look else­where for po­si­tions that would al­low you to work with chil­dren with autism.

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