Trump, Clin­ton spar dur­ing de­bate

Daily Local News (West Chester, PA) - - FRONT PAGE - By Julie Pace and Lisa Lerer As­so­ci­ated Press

LAS VE­GAS >> Threat­en­ing to up­end a ba­sic pil­lar of Amer­i­can democ­racy, Don­ald Trump re­fused Wed­nes­day night to say he would ac­cept the re­sults of the Novem­ber elec­tion if he loses to Hil­lary Clin­ton. The Demo­cratic nom­i­nee de­clared Trump’s re­sis­tance “hor­ri­fy­ing.”

Trump has spent the days lead­ing up to Wed­nes­day night’s pres­i­den­tial de­bate warn­ing vot­ers that the elec­tion will be “rigged.” Asked whether he would ac­cept the re­sults, he said, “I will tell you at the time. I’ll keep you in sus­pense.”

Ear­lier, Clin­ton force­fully ac­cused Trump of fa­vor­ing Rus­sia’s leader over Amer­i­can mil­i­tary and in­tel­li­gence ex­perts Wed­nes­day night, as the Repub­li­can nom­i­nee point­edly re­fused to ac­cept the U.S. gov­ern­ment’s as­ser­tion that Moscow has sought to med­dle in the pres­i­den­tial elec­tion.

In a com­bat­ive ex­change in the fi­nal pres­i­den­tial de­bate, Clin­ton charged that Rus­sian Pres­i­dent Vladimir Putin was back­ing Trump be­cause “he’d rather have a pup­pet as pres­i­dent of the United States.”

Trump de­nied any re­la­tion­ship with Putin and said he would con­demn any for­eign in­ter­fer­ence in the elec­tion. But he no­tably re­fused to ac­cept the in­tel­li­gence com­mu­nity’s as­sess­ment that Rus­sia was in­volved in the hack­ing of Demo­cratic or­ga­ni­za­tions. The Clin­ton cam­paign has also said the FBI is in­ves­ti­gat­ing Rus­sia’s in­volve­ment in the hack­ing of a top ad­viser’s emails.

The third pres­i­den­tial de­bate opened with a mea­sured, pol­icy-fo­cused dis­cus­sion — a stark con­trast to the heated and highly per­sonal clashes that de­fined the ear­lier con­tests. How­ever, Trump quickly re­verted to his pre­vi­ous style of re­peat­edly burst­ing in to in­ter­rupt Clin­ton as well as mod­er­a­tor Chris Wal­lace of Fox News.

The 90-minute con­test in Las Ve­gas came just un­der three weeks be­fore Elec­tion Day and with early vot­ing un­der­way in more than 30 states.

The can­di­dates out­lined starkly dif­fer­ent vi­sions for the Supreme Court un­der their po­ten­tial pres­i­den­cies, with the Repub­li­can declar­ing the land­mark Roe v. Wade rul­ing le­gal­iz­ing abor­tion would be over­turned by his ju­di­cial nom­i­nees.

Clin­ton vowed to ap­point jus­tices who would up­hold the rul­ing le­gal­iz­ing abor­tion, say­ing, “We have come too far to have that turned back now.”

Trump pressed Clin­ton on im­mi­gra­tion, ac­cus­ing her of want­ing an “open bor­ders” pol­icy, a char­ac­ter­i­za­tion she vig­or­ously dis­putes. The Repub­li­can, who has called for build­ing a wall the length of the U.S.-Mex­ico border, said that un­der a Clin­ton pres­i­dency, “Peo­ple are go­ing to pour into our coun­try.”

Clash­ing on trade, Trump said Clin­ton had mis­rep­re­sented her po­si­tion on the Trans-Pa­cific Part­ner­ship, not­ing that she had orig­i­nally called it the “gold stan­dard” of trade agree­ments. Clin­ton shot back that once the deal was fin­ished, it didn’t meet her stan­dards. “I’ll be against it when I’m pres­i­dent,” she said.

For Trump, the de­bate marked one of his fi­nal chances to re­shape a race that ap­pears to be slip­ping away from him. Clin­ton’s cam­paign is con­fi­dently ex­pand­ing into tra­di­tion­ally Repub­li­can states, while Trump’s nar­row elec­toral path is shrink­ing. Al­ready un­pop­u­lar with a ma­jor­ity of Amer­i­cans, the GOP nom­i­nee has been bat­tered by re­cent rev­e­la­tions of his vul­gar com­ments about women and a string of sex­ual as­sault al­le­ga­tions.

Clin­ton be­gan the de­bate with a lead in most bat­tle­ground states. Her chal­lenge was to both keep up her ef­forts to paint Trump as un­fit to be pres­i­dent and start mov­ing to ease Amer­ica’s deep di­vi­sions, which have only been ex­ac­er­bated dur­ing the cam­paign. The lat­ter is no easy task for the Demo­cratic nom­i­nee, given the pub­lic’s per­sis­tent ques­tions about her hon­esty and trust­wor­thi­ness.

Clin­ton faced de­bate ques­tions for the first time about rev­e­la­tions in her top ad­viser’s hacked emails that show her strik­ing a dif­fer­ent tone in pri­vate than in pub­lic re­gard­ing Wall Street banks and trade. She quickly turned the dis­cus­sion to Rus­sia’s po­ten­tial role in steal­ing the emails.

Trump en­tered the fi­nal de­bate fac­ing a string of sex­ual as­sault ac­cu­sa­tions from women who came for­ward af­ter he de­nied in the pre­vi­ous con­test that he had kissed or groped women with­out their con­sent. Trump’s de­nial came af­ter the re­lease of a video of in which he’s heard brag­ging about ex­actly that.

Trump de­nied the ac­cu­sa­tions anew, say­ing the women com­ing for­ward “ei­ther want fame or her cam­paign did it.”

Clin­ton said Trump “thinks be­lit­tling women makes him big­ger. He goes af­ter their dig­nity, their self-worth.”

For Trump, the de­bate marked one of his fi­nal chances to re­shape a race that ap­pears to be slip­ping away from him. Clin­ton’s cam­paign is con­fi­dently ex­pand­ing into tra­di­tion­ally Repub­li­can states, while Trump’s nar­row elec­toral path is shrink­ing.

THE AS­SO­CI­ATED PRESS

Demo­cratic pres­i­den­tial nom­i­nee Hil­lary Clin­ton ex­changes views with Repub­li­can pres­i­den­tial nom­i­nee Don­ald Trump dur­ing the third pres­i­den­tial de­bate at UNLV in Las Ve­gas Wed­nes­day.

THE AS­SO­CI­ATED PRESS

Demo­cratic pres­i­den­tial nom­i­nee Hil­lary Clin­ton and Repub­li­can pres­i­den­tial nom­i­nee Don­ald Trump face off dur­ing the third pres­i­den­tial de­bate at UNLV in Las Ve­gas Wed­nes­day.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.