‘The Big Stitch’

Shon Gal­le­gos and hus­band Rory Moon com­bine gar­ment, hos­pi­tal­ity back­grounds

GA Voice - - Work it! -

By PA­TRICK SAUNDERS

psaun­ders@the­gavoice.com

There’s a new player in At­lanta’s em­broi­dery busi­ness, and they come not-so-straight out of the city’s LGBT com­mu­nity.

The Big Stitch At­lanta is the brain­child of Shon Gal­le­gos, a vet­eran of the city’s gar­ment in­dus­try who last fall de­cided to break out into his own busi­ness for the first time. Along with him for the ride is his hus­band, co-owner Rory Moon, an At­lanta na­tive who has worked in the city’s hos­pi­tal­ity in­dus­try for over 15 years.

The Big Stitch can han­dle ev­ery­thing from cor­po­rate ap­parel and uni­form needs to per­sonal mono­gram­ming, sports uni­forms, screen print­ing and 3D em­broi­dery. Gal­le­gos and Moon stepped away from the nee­dle and thread one re­cent af­ter­noon to talk to Ge­or­gia Voice about their new ven­ture.

Ge­or­gia Voice: When did you start The Big Stitch?

Moon:

Shon had ex­pressed that he wanted to open a busi­ness back in mid-sum­mer and we kind of started from there. We opened the busi­ness of­fi­cially in Au­gust of this year and have been mov­ing along since then.

Shon, what’s your back­ground in the gar­ment in­dus­try?

Gal­le­gos:

I have been in the em­broi­dery in­dus­try for al­most 20 years work­ing for a big com­pany in At­lanta, so I’ve learned a lot about the cus­tomer and the prod­uct and the qual­ity of the em­broi­dery.

What mo­ti­vated you to want to start your own busi­ness?

Gal­le­gos:

I’m not pleased in the way

Jan­uary 8, 2016

“A lot of the prob­lem in this busi­ness is that it’s so im­per­sonal that you never really even talk to the peo­ple that are do­ing the work or are even sell­ing the work. So we’re try­ing to build a lo­cal busi­ness and work within the com­mu­nity and really give qual­ity ser­vice to peo­ple.”

—The Big Stitch co-owner Rory Moon

other com­pa­nies treat their cus­tomers. They don’t ex­plain to them what the prod­uct is. So one of my goals is to ex­plain to the cus­tomer how em­broi­dery works and give them some tips be­cause I feel ca­pa­ble enough to do it.

Rory, what’s your role in the com­pany? Moon:

I’ve been the ini­tial in­vestor in the busi­ness but also I’m do­ing mar­ket­ing as well as head­ing up the larger sales that we do with most of our busi­ness clients. Shon’s do­ing a lot of that now as well.

What kind of or­ders have you typ­i­cally been get­ting?

Moon:

We’re do­ing really across the board now a lot of cus­tom mono­gram­ming for smaller busi­ness clients. That’s what we’re mar­ket­ing to­wards is small busi­ness and lo­cal. We really want to stay lo­cal and kind of build up from a really solid foun­da­tion with the cus­tomers that we have and just pro­vide really good cus­tomer ser­vice as well as a qual­ity prod­uct.

A lot of the prob­lem in this busi­ness is that it’s so im­per­sonal that you never really even talk to the peo­ple that are do­ing the work or are even sell­ing the work. So we’re try­ing to build a lo­cal busi­ness and work within the com­mu­nity and really give qual­ity ser­vice to peo­ple.

The ma­jor­ity of ev­ery­thing that we’re do­ing is small sale col­lat­eral for com­pa­nies, like uni­form gar­ments, cor­po­rate ap­parel, shirts that would have your logo and your name on it for employees, that’s the ma­jor­ity of it. We’ll do one-offs and cus­tom work. We’ve done a lot of stuff for wed­dings like mono­grammed nap­kins, ev­ery­thing you can think of.

Has there been an or­der that was par­tic­u­larly chal­leng­ing ei­ther cre­atively or be­cause of the size?

Moon:

We can han­dle the vol­ume, but I think that the chal­lenge is like for any other small busi­ness that’s start­ing up—cap­tur­ing the client, find­ing where your mar­ket is at and your niche is at and bring­ing those peo­ple in. We’ve been lucky, we’ve really had a lot of re­sponses from the mar­ket­ing we’ve done and we’ve kept our head above wa­ter so ob­vi­ously we want to stay on that tra­jec­tory.

The chal­lenge is get­ting the right peo­ple in that aren’t look­ing for the best bar­gain in town, they’re look­ing for qual­ity prod­uct. That’s what we’re do­ing is sell­ing qual­ity and sell­ing good ser­vice and let­ting peo­ple know that we’re ac­tu­ally do­ing the work and over­see­ing the work be­ing done.

We’re cer­tainly try­ing to stay com­pet­i­tive with prices, but we’re in a mar­ket where of­ten peo­ple will un­der­sell you and I think that hap­pens across the board. We’re sell­ing a qual­ity prod­uct and we want to make sure that ev­ery­one comes back to us and that they’re happy with what we’re do­ing.

Would you want to open your own phys­i­cal space of The Big Stitch at some point?

Moon:

We have a small sew shop here in town but we do want to branch out and get a small re­tail space where we can show the ac­tual process of what’s goes on. The sew shop is just in a kind of scary lo­ca­tion and we’d rather not have peo­ple there, so we want to get to a point where we can show­case what we’re do­ing and clients can come in and see what we’re work­ing on. So that’s our next step, and really just build­ing a solid foun­da­tion in the At­lanta busi­ness com­mu­nity.

Shon Gal­le­gos (l) and his hus­band Rory Moon (r) started The Big Stitch last Au­gust. (Cour­tesy photo)

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