HOW SAFE IS AN OPERATING ROOM AGAINST AT­TACKS?

iD magazine - - Technology -

Scalpels, pads— and dozens of elec­tronic de­vices. With­out com­put­ers, mod­ern surg­eries could hardly be per­formed. But while fire­walls and virus scan­ners are to­tal no-brain­ers on desk­top PCS, the OR still lags be­hind in this area: A 2013 study by the U.S. Depart­ment of Home­land Se­cu­rity re­vealed around 300 med­i­cal de­vices from 40 man­u­fac­tur­ers were po­ten­tially vul­ner­a­ble to hack at­tacks. If hack­ers have ac­cess to a hos­pi­tal’s net­work, they can iden­tify de­vices and ma­nip­u­late them un­no­ticed.

But was the mat­ter con­cluded too soon? Could there be more to it?

CAN A CAR BE HACKED THROUGH THE IN­TER­NET?

In­ves­ti­ga­tors do not find sig­nif­i­cant traces of an in­tox­i­cat­ing sub­stance, nor does the au­topsy un­cover any bul­let holes or ex­plo­sives residue— there­fore they are left baf­fled as to why in­ves­tiga­tive jour­nal­ist Michael Hast­ings sud­denly lost con­trol of his car. Spec­u­la­tion abounds: From faint­ing to fall­ing asleep at the wheel right on up to a de­pres­sion-trig­gered sui­cide at­tempt—all pos­si­ble causes are plau­si­ble. “This is a very un­usual case—and it is pre­cisely the type of ac­ci­dent that a hacker could cause,” says Richard Clarke, who served for years as the U.S. Na­tional Co­or­di­na­tor for Se­cu­rity, In­fra­struc­ture Pro­tec­tion

COM­PLETE RE­SET Key­hole surgery re­lies on minia­ture cam­eras and in­stru­ments that are con­ducted to the treat­ment site in the body via catheter. Hack­ers could ma­nip­u­late these highly sen­si­tive de­vices— or even shut down the operating room en­tirely. ANESTHETI

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