TOP SE­CU­RITY TIPS

8 WAYS TO PRO­TECT YOUR IPHONE FROM HACK­ERS

iPhone Life Magazine - - Top Tips - BY CON­NER CAREY

We tend to think of our iPhones get­ting hacked as a far-off sce­nario, but large tech com­pa­nies like Ap­ple pay hack­ers big money to find the bugs and loop­holes they can't see. Ear­lier this year, Ap­ple re­leased iOS 10.3.2 with se­cu­rity up­dates that cor­rected flaws that had gone un­no­ticed for a cou­ple years. While it's not worth pan­ick­ing over, it's good to take pre­cau­tions. Each iOS up­date puts more se­cu­rity fea­tures di­rectly on your iPhone than ever be­fore. Can some­one hack your iPhone? Sure it's pos­si­ble; some­one can even hack an iPhone re­motely. But you can do a lot to se­cure your iPhone and pro­tect it from pos­si­ble hack­ers. The fol­low­ing tips will help you im­ple­ment ev­ery safe­guard pos­si­ble, al­low­ing you to pro­tect your iPhone from hack­ers, both lo­cal and re­mote.

EN­ABLE TWO-FAC­TOR AUTHEN­TI­CA­TION

Two-Fac­tor Authen­ti­ca­tion is Ap­ple's lat­est fail­safe for keep­ing your Ap­ple ID se­cure. Once en­abled, you'll be re­quired to use a trusted de­vice to ver­ify each time you log in to a new de­vice with your Ap­ple ID. For ex­am­ple, say you get a new iPad. When you go to sign in with your Ap­ple ID for the first time, your other trusted de­vices like your iPhone will re­ceive a no­ti­fi­ca­tion ask­ing for ap­proval. If you al­low, your iPhone will dis­play a ver­i­fi­ca­tion code. Once you en­ter the ver­i­fi­ca­tion code on your iPad, the de­vice is ap­proved. This fea­ture works well be­cause any­time some­one tries to log in to your Ap­ple ID ac­count, you'll get a no­ti­fi­ca­tion and have the abil­ity to ap­prove or deny the at­tempt. To turn on Two-Fac­tor Authen­ti­ca­tion, go to Set­tings and tap your Ap­ple ID pro­file at the top of the screen. Se­lect Pass­word & Se­cu­rity and then turn on Two-Fac­tor Authen­ti­ca­tion.

TURN ON FIND MY IPHONE

En­abling Find My iPhone is a no-brainer. When turned on, you can see the lo­ca­tion of your miss­ing de­vice us­ing the Find My iPhone app on any iDe­vice or from any browser via iCloud. com. While we don't rec­om­mend track­ing down an iPhone that's fallen into the hands of a thief, we've found it to be an ex­cel­lent resource for track­ing down your de­vice if you lose it. The best thing about Find My iPhone is that if your de­vice is stolen, you can re­motely erase your de­vice so that none of your per­sonal in­for­ma­tion can be stolen too. To turn Find My iPhone on, sim­ply go to Set­tings and se­lect your Ap­ple ID pro­file. Se­lect iCloud > Find My iPhone, and then tog­gle Find My iPhone on.

SWITCH TO A SIX-DIGIT PASS­CODE

If you've cho­sen not to switch to a longer pass­code you should re­con­sider. Any in­con­ve­nience is worth the added se­cu­rity. The num­ber of pos­si­ble com­bi­na­tions for six dig­its ver­sus four dig­its is huge. If you have a hard time re­mem­ber­ing six dig­its, spell out a six-let­ter word for your pass­code in­stead. To do this, go to Set­tings > Touch ID & Pass­code > Change Pass­code. When choos­ing a new pass­code, se­lect Pass­code op­tions and choose 6-Digit Nu­meric Code.

SET YOUR PHONE TO SELF-DE­STRUCT

OK, so this set­ting doesn't lit­er­ally make your phone self-de­struct, but close enough. In­stead, it will wipe your de­vice clean af­ter ten con­sec­u­tive failed pass­code at­tempts. I would only turn this set­ting on if you're su­per con­cerned about some of the in­for­ma­tion you have on your phone. Peo­ple with chil­dren should be care­ful too, since ten failed at­tempts erases every­thing. But if you have auto iCloud backup en­abled, the dam­age will be min­i­mal. To turn on Erase Data, go to Set­tings > Touch ID & Pass­code and tog­gle on Erase Data.

CHANGE YOUR AP­PLE ID PASS­WORD REG­U­LARLY

Your Ap­ple ID is in­cred­i­bly im­por­tant to your iPhone's over­all se­cu­rity. Chang­ing your Ap­ple ID pass­word reg­u­larly is the best way to en­sure no one ac­cesses it with­out your per­mis­sion. I rec­om­mend cre­at­ing a new Ap­ple ID pass­word ev­ery six months. If you have two-fac­tor authen­ti­ca­tion en­abled, you can change your Ap­ple ID pass­word right on your de­vice. Just go to Set­tings and se­lect your Ap­ple ID at the top. Se­lect Pass­word & Se­cu­rity and then Change Pass­word.

BE SMART ON­LINE, IN MES­SAGES, AND WHEN OPEN­ING EMAILS

A big way many hack­ers will get to your iPhone in­for­ma­tion re­motely is through mal­ware links and scammy emails. A good rule of thumb is to only open links, mes­sages, and emails from sources you trust. If you re­ceive any mes­sages or emails from un­known senders ask­ing for in­for­ma­tion, or if the mes­sage in­cludes a ran­dom link or other sus­pi­cious text, sim­ply delete it. Also be wary of hack­ers and scam­mers pos­ing as com­pa­nies like Paypal and Ap­ple. I've got­ten fake Paypal emails in the past telling me I'd been locked out of my ac­count and that I need to click some- where and sign in. It looked com­pletely le­git. I clicked on the link, started to en­ter my info, and hap­pened to look at the URL and see that it was a sub­tle vari­a­tion of Paypal and not Paypal it­self. Luck­ily, I caught it in time. I con­sider my­self savvy to these types of things. But they still al­most got me! Stay vig­i­lant, my friends.

USE SE­CURE WI-FI & AVOID LOGINS IN PUB­LIC

Pub­lic Wi-Fi is one of the eas­i­est ways to get hacked since the net­work is in­her­ently less se­cure. For pay­ing bills, log­ging into ac­counts, and other pri­vate ac­tiv­ity, it's highly rec­om­mended you use a closed Wi-Fi net­work, like the one you have set up at home. A lot of peo­ple need to use pub­lic Wi-Fi as they do the ma­jor­ity of their work in cafes. If that's you, con­sider down­load­ing a Vir­tual Pri­vate Net­work (VPN), which will cre­ate a pri­vate se­cu­rity net around your in­ter­net ac­tiv­ity.

ONLY USE TRUSTED CHARG­ING STA­TIONS

In the last few years, you may have no­ticed charg­ing sta­tions pop­ping up in air­ports, cafes, and other pub­lic places. While these sta­tions are de­signed to be con­ve­nient for our mod­ern lives, they aren't guar­an­teed to be le­git­i­mate and could al­low a hacker to ac­cess your in­for­ma­tion through a com­pro­mised port. The eas­i­est way around this is to keep a small bat­tery pack with you to charge your de­vices when they're low. That way, every­thing is charged at home but you also have ex­tra power on-the-go. If you're in a tight spot and need to use a pub­lic charg­ing space, just make sure it's le­git­i­mate and not just some ran­dom charger that showed up there.

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