IPHONE PHO­TOG­RA­PHY LES­SON

HOW TO USE HDR TO CAP­TURE GOR­GEOUS LAND­SCAPE & NA­TURE SHOTS

iPhone Life Magazine - - Top Tips - BY SARAH KINGS­BURY

Y ou're out on a na­ture hike, and you want to cap­ture a photo on your iPhone of the breath­tak­ing moun­tain range and river run­ning be­low. But in the bright sun­light, you keep end­ing up with ar­eas of the photo that are over- or un­der-ex­posed! That's where High Dy­namic Range (HDR) can help. In this ar­ti­cle, you'll learn all about HDR: what it means, when to use it, and tips and in­struc­tions to get the most from the fea­ture on your iPhone. Note: The iPhone XS, XS Max, and XR will of­fer an HDR fea­ture called Smart HDR, which will show greater de­tail than ear­lier iPhone mod­els by merg­ing only the best parts of sev­eral ex­po­sures into one. ap­pear ac­cu­rately, but not both. It will ei­ther ap­pear as though the sky is washed out and over­ex­posed or the light­house is just a dark shadow and is un­der­ex­posed. By us­ing HDR, your cam­era com­bines mul­ti­ple ex­po­sures so that both the sky and light­house are op­ti­mally ex­posed and the con­trast lev­els of the photo are bal­anced.

The HDR op­tion on your iPhone com­bines mul­ti­ple shots, taken within mil­lisec­onds of each other, and stitches them to­gether into one photo. The shots cap­ture each part of the sub­ject at dif­fer­ent ex­po­sures. The soft­ware then com­bines the prop­erly ex­posed parts of each of the im­ages into one shot that looks seam­less.

HOW DOES HDR WORK?

Dy­namic Range in pho­tog­ra­phy is the range from the light­est light and the dark­est dark present in a photo. Our eyes can see a much larger dy­namic range than a cam­era—and that's where HDR comes in to make up the dif­fer­ence. For ex­am­ple, say you're tak­ing a picture of a light­house against a blue sky. You can fo­cus and prop­erly ex­pose the light­house, or you can fo­cus on the sky. One or the other will

WHEN SHOULD I USE HDR?

HDR is best used to bal­ance high-con­trast scenes. Here are some ex­am­ples of sit­u­a­tions in which to use HDR:

• Sta­tion­ary Scenes: Since HDR on the iPhone com­bines mul­ti­ple shots into one, it doesn't cap­ture a mov­ing scene well, since too much move­ment might cause the mul­ti­ple pho­tos to align in­cor­rectly. You can use HDR to ex­per­i­ment with shoot­ing dou­ble ex­po­sures, but for the in­tended pur­pose of HDR, move­ment is a detri­ment to the shot. HDR shots turn out best when the photo is taken us­ing a tri­pod. If you don't have a tri­pod, make sure to steady your hand be­fore snap­ping a photo.

• Land­scapes: HDR is ca­pa­ble of cap­tur­ing the light of the sky and the dark of the land in one shot that doesn't make ei­ther the land ap­pear too dark or the sky over­ex­posed.

• Ob­jects in Di­rect Sun­light: Sun­light casts shad­ows cre­at­ing a wider range of con­trast in a photo. Us­ing HDR brings bal­ance to all the el­e­ments, both light and shadow. • Scenes with Back­light­ing: If you have a scene that's

bright in the back­ground, HDR will lighten the fore­ground with­out mak­ing it look washed out.

TAK­ING PHO­TOS WITH HDR: IPHONE 7 PLUS & EAR­LIER

For older iPhones, you can choose to turn HDR to auto, on, or off within the Cam­era app. • Open your Cam­era app. • At the top, tap HDR.

• Choose On to leave HDR on and Auto to let the cam­era de­cide when it's nec­es­sary.

• When HDR is en­abled, you'll see a yel­low box that says HDR near the bot­tom of the screen. • Tap the big white shut­ter but­ton to take your picture. • It will au­to­mat­i­cally save to your Cam­era Roll.

TAK­ING PHO­TOS WITH HDR: IPHONE 8 & LATER

If you have an iPhone 8, 8 Plus, X, XS, XS Max, HDR mode is au­to­mat­i­cally en­abled un­less you turn it off in Set­tings. You'll no­tice that with Auto HDR en­abled, the Cam­era app on newer iPhones won't have an HDR icon to the right of the flash icon. If you would rather de­cide for your­self when to use HDR rather than hav­ing your iPhone de­cide for you: • Open the Set­tings app. • Tap on Cam­era. • Tog­gle off Auto HDR.

• Now re­turn to your Cam­era app, and you'll see HDR next to the flash icon with a slash through it; tap it. • Now you have the op­tion to choose Auto, On, or Off for your HDR set­ting.

HOW TO VIEW HDR PHO­TOS ON YOUR IPHONE

When you're re­view­ing your pic­tures in the Pho­tos app, it's im­por­tant to be able to tell which pho­tos used HDR. To do this: • Open the Pho­tos app and nav­i­gate to an in­di­vid­ual shot

• Pho­tos that used HDR will say so in the top left cor­ner of the preview. � Sarah Kings­bury is the se­nior web editor of iPhoneLife.com. She goes al­most nowhere with­out her iPhone and is a con­trib­u­tor to the site's Tip of the Day col­umn. She has over a decade of ex­pe­ri­ence writ­ing and edit­ing for on­line and print pub­li­ca­tions.

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