The Fem­i­nist Fa­tale

MI­COL HE­BRON

Los Angeles Confidential - - Scene -

De­scribe your process. It’s en­com­passed by what I call “Fem­i­nism 4D.” I try to live fem­i­nism in all di­rec­tions and at all times. I have ana­log pro­cesses and dig­i­tal pro­cesses—IRL and URL. My ana­log work is of­ten about cre­at­ing com­mu­nity and di­a­logue. I spend a lot of time on­line, nav­i­gat­ing and think­ing about the spa­ces, images, lan­guage, and al­go­rithms of so­cial me­dia and the in­ter­net. I find the in­ter­net fas­ci­nat­ing and ter­ri­fy­ing… and to­tally in­tox­i­cat­ing. It is a barom­e­ter for con­tem­po­rary cul­ture.

Has the po­lit­i­cal cli­mate taken your art in a new di­rec­tion?

The things that I was do­ing be­fore the elec­tion—mak­ing posts about equity and leg­is­la­tion, or­ga­niz­ing fem­i­nist events, build­ing space and op­por­tu­nity for par­tic­i­pa­tory di­a­logues and projects—[have] be­come am­pli­fied [since]! What is your first mem­ory of mak­ing art? My par­ents were very cre­ative. We dyed our milk or mashed pota­toes blue, green, or pur­ple, for fun. My mother en­cour­aged all kinds of crafty things that in­volved innovation and re­cy­cling… I re­mem­ber mak­ing a Jack­son Pol­lock– style paint­ing in fourth grade, and the teacher was ef­fec­tive in get­ting me to

un­der­stand that it wasn’t about the fin­ished paint­ing, but rather about the act of mak­ing it.

How do you walk the line be­tween art and tech­nol­ogy?

Is there even is a line? Art, life, tech­nol­ogy, na­ture— it’s all in­te­grated all the time for me.

What’s next?

I’d like to learn how to code, and how to be a hacker. [laughs] I think cod­ing and hack­ing hold the most po­ten­tial for ac­tivism, in­sti­tu­tional cri­tique, dis­sent, and in­ter­ven­tion in the dig­i­tal age. In all re­al­ity, it’s un­likely I’ll ever be a hacker—but maybe I can team up with one! mi­col­he­bron.com

“L.A. HAS A LOT OF SPACE IN BE­TWEEN THINGS.

THERE ARE A LOT

OF UNFIXED

MO­MENTS, WHICH CAN MAKE [FOR] GOOD PIC­TURES.”

—owen kydd

“I’m ready to take what I’ve learned

from record­ing near-still mo­ments and ap­ply it back to

the nar­ra­tive of cin­ema,” says artist Owen Kydd about

how he feels his video in­stal­la­tion

work, such as Ad­di­tive (2016), has prepped him for

film­mak­ing.

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