Fa­tal en­coun­ters

Los Angeles Times - - CALIFORNIA - —Kate Mather

EULIA LOVE, 1979

In­ci­dent: Two LAPD of­fi­cers killed Love af­ter they were called to her South Los An­ge­les home over an un­paid gas bill.

Out­come: The depart­ment found the of­fi­cers acted within pol­icy, prompt­ing wide­spread out­rage. The Po­lice Com­mis­sion found the of­fi­cers vi­o­lated depart­ment pol­icy and set new rules stip­u­lat­ing that the com­mis­sion would ad­ju­di­cate ma­jor use of force cases.

MAR­GARET MITCHELL, 1999

In­ci­dent: Of­fi­cers killed the men­tally ill home­less woman af­ter po­lice said she lunged at them with a screw­driver.

Out­come: Then-Po­lice Chief Bernard Parks ac­knowl­edged that of­fi­cers used poor tac­tics but said the of­fi­cer who fired was le­git­i­mately con­cerned for his safety. The com­mis­sion con­cluded that the shoot­ing was out of pol­icy.

DEVIN BROWN, 2005

In­ci­dent: An of­fi­cer killed Brown af­ter he drove a car onto a side­walk and then backed it up to­ward the of­fi­cer.

Out­come: Then-Chief Wil­liam Brat­ton said the of­fi­cer’s ac­tions were jus­ti­fied be­cause his life was threat­ened. The com­mis­sion over­ruled him.

STEVEN WASH­ING­TON, 2010

In­ci­dent: Wash­ing­ton, an un­armed autis­tic man, was killed by of­fi­cers af­ter they al­legedly spot­ted a dark ob­ject in his waist­band.

Out­come: Chief Char­lie Beck found the of­fi­cers vi­o­lated LAPD poli­cies in how they ap­proached and en­gaged Wash­ing­ton, but said it was rea­son­able for them to think he had a gun and in­tended to shoot them. The com­mis­sion dis­agreed, say­ing Wash­ing­ton “did not en­gage in any con­duct that posed a threat war­rant­ing the use of lethal force.”

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