Area fish­ing is red hot

Maryland Independent - - Sports - Jamie Drake jamiedrake­out­doors@out­look.com

There are plenty of spot and then some for fish­er­men in the Patux­ent and Po­tomac rivers. Just a cup of blood­worms and a bot­tom-rig is all it takes to be suc­cess­ful when the fish are this plen­ti­ful.

This good for­tune won’t last all sum­mer, so en­joy some time out­side and put some fil­lets in the freezer while the fish­ing is red hot.

South­ern Mary­land lakes and ponds — There’s very lit­tle chance you’ll be fly­ing the skunk flag if you spend some time at a lo­cal pond in the early morn­ing or late af­ter­noon.

Top­wa­ters for bass or a lit­tle piece of worm hung about two feet be­low a bob­ber for bluegill are al­most guar­an­teed to catch some fish. And if you have per­mis­sion to fish a pri­vate pond, don’t for­get to take along your fil­let knife, some Zip-loc bags and a trash bag for the leftovers you will be tak­ing home and dis­pos­ing of prop­erly. Present the farmer or pond owner with some fresh fish fil­lets and you

will likely be warmly wel­comed back next time. South­ern Mary­land lakes

and ponds — There’s very lit­tle chance you’ll be fly­ing the skunk flag if you spend some time at a lo­cal pond in the early morn­ing or late af­ter­noon.

Top­wa­ters for bass or a lit­tle piece of worm hung about two feet be­low a bob­ber for bluegill are al­most guar­an­teed to catch some fish. And if you have per­mis­sion to fish a pri­vate pond, don’t for­get to take along your fil­let knife, some Zip-loc bags and a trash bag for the leftovers you will be tak­ing home and dis­pos­ing of prop­erly. Present the farmer or pond owner with some fresh fish fil­lets and you will likely be warmly wel­comed back next time.

Patux­ent River — Capt. Bernie Shea (www.shead­lady.com) on his char­ter boat “Shea-D-Lady” re­ports he’s been hav­ing great bot­tom-fish­ing trips over the past week with large spot and some keeper croaker mixed into the catch. An­glers are av­er­ag­ing 50 or more fish on one of his half-day trips from the Calvert Ma­rina.

The Solomons Char­ter Cap­tains As­so­ci­a­tion fleet (www. fish­solomons.com) re­ports that Green Holly and just north of the Gov. Thomas John­son Bridge have been hot spots for the usual trio of croaker, spot and white perch. An­glers look­ing for rock­fish have to set their alarms plenty early to get out on the wa­ter by sun­rise.

Po­tomac River — Andy An­drze­jew­ski with the Reel Bass Ad­ven­ture guides (301932-1509) said the bass bite has be­come more tide-spe­cific in the sum­mer heat.

A cou­ple of low tides with low light and catches can be good. Dur­ing day­time heat, bass are seek­ing shade, so the usual ar­ray of top­wa­ter baits fol­lowed up with plas­tics and small white spin­ner­baits or vi­brat­ing jig baits are what he rec­om­mends dur­ing morn­ing hours. Once the sun is high, bass can be found in shady ar­eas around boat docks and wrecks, near creek ledges, and deep in grasses.

Fi­nesse worms work well around docks and hard cover, while thick grass re­quires heavy jig and crea­ture com­bos.

Capt. Den­nis Flem­ing of Fishama­jig Guide Ser­vice (240-538-1260) re­ports a rather in­tense fishery for stripers from Colo­nial Beach to the Gov. Harry W. Nice Me­mo­rial Bridge. The ma­jor­ity of an­glers are trolling, but light tackle fish­er­men are scor­ing in shal­low wa­ter.

Flem­ing rec­om­mends fish­ing the humps and bumps early and late. Most fish are un­der­sized, so han­dle with care, but keep­ers are pos­si­ble for per­sis­tent an­glers.

Aqua­land Ma­rina (301-259-2222) re­ports ex­cel­lent bot­tom fish­ing

at Mor­gan­town Bar and Swan Point for croaker, perch and spot. Cat­fish are plen­ti­ful above the Nice Bridge. Ch­e­sa­peake Bay —

Capt. Wall­eye Pete (www. walleyepete.com) is cur­rently work­ing the waters from Sharpes Is­land up to Rock Hall and re­ports rainy days are pro­duc­ing lots of ac­tion with Storm Chug Bugs and Zara Spook sur­face plugs on rocky struc­ture from 4 to 12 feet deep.

When it’s not rainy or over­cast, good fish­ing can still be had from day­light un­til a half-hour after sun­rise. Later in the day, Wall­eye Pete has been find­ing schools of fish north of the Bay Bridge and rec­om­mends tar­get­ing them with 1-ounce Hard­head Cus­tom Baits skirted jigs in ei­ther chartreuse or white.

Speck­led sea trout

are be­ing caught from Hoop­ers Is­land down to Smith Is­land. Pale tails on 3/8-ounce jig­heads will be your best bet for hook­ing one.

Ken Lamb of the Tackle Box in Lex­ing­ton Park (301-863-8151) re­ports an­glers are catch­ing Span­ish mack­erel on the edges of the ship’s chan­nel at Smith Point and south to the mouth of the Rap­pa­han­nock. The mack­erel should come up to Point Look­out, Hoop­ers Is­land, the Tar­gets

and the Patux­ent soon.

At­lantic Ocean — The 30th an­nual Ocean City Tuna Tour­na­ment kicked off Thurs­day, so it’s go­ing to be a busy week­end in Ocean City. This year you can watch the weigh-in at the Fish­ing Cen­ter as it’s hap­pen­ing at www. oceanci­ty­tu­na­tour­na­ment.com/fish-cam.

Gulp Swim­ming Mul­lets is the bait of choice for floun­der and the hot spot this week has been near the duck blinds in the South Bay.

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