We Will Al­ways Have To Deal With Disasters

McDonald County Press - - CHURCH - By Dr. Don Kuehle United Methodist, Re­tired Jackson, MO DR. DON KUEHLE IS A RE­TIRED UNITED METHODIST MIN­IS­TER WHO LIVES IN JACKSON. OPIN­IONS ARE THOSE OF THE AU­THOR.

Disasters have been hap­pen­ing since the be­gin­ning of time. And we have been deal­ing with disasters in much the same way since the be­gin­ning of time. Ask­ing why did this ter­ri­ble thing hap­pen? Who is to blame? What do we do now?

Disasters come in two forms: man-made disasters and natural disasters. Man-made disasters have been around since Adam and Eve, and Cain and Abel. They still abound in to­day’s world: some are due to hu­man er­ror and judg­ment; oth­ers are due to mankind’s sin and the forces of evil that sin re­leases. Ter­ror­ist at­tacks. Train wrecks. 9/11. Auto ac­ci­dents. The blame for these disasters are easy to pin­point. Why they hap­pened is not so easy; some­times we don’t know the “why.”

Natural disasters have been a part of our lives since God cre­ated the natural or­der. Hur­ri­canes. Tor­na­does. Floods. Land­slides. We’re still ask­ing “why’? We don’t al­ways find the an­swer. We do, how­ever, know who to blame: (1) Cli­mate change. Not so! Natural disasters were oc­cur­ring hun­dreds of years be­fore we be­gan pol­lut­ing the at­mos­phere. (2) God’s pun­ish­ment for sin. Some are say­ing that the hor­ren­dous flood­ing in Texas is be­cause God is pun­ish­ing the peo­ple there for their great sins. Not true! Je­sus said, hun­dreds of years ago, that God does not work that way. (3) Peo­ple in au­thor­ity. “They” should have known this dis­as­ter was com­ing — and warned us ahead of time. No way! Not un­less they were God would they have that fore­knowl­edge.

SO, what can we learn from ei­ther type of dis­as­ter? (1) We can’t al­ways con­trol what hap­pens; (2) Noth­ing we have is ours — all we “own” be­longs to God, and is a gift to us from Him; (3) Hu­man life is tem­po­rary; we can lose ev­ery­thing with­out warn­ing, in a mo­ment of time; (4) How we deal with disasters can ei­ther draw us closer to God or turn us away from God; (5) There is tremen­dous power in prayer; through our prayers, God re­leases strength and power and courage and hope for the fu­ture into the lives of the peo­ple af­fected by the dis­as­ter; (6) Disasters bring forth the best in us — as we rally to­gether to help the vic­tims of a dis­as­ter.

Disasters will con­tinue to hap­pen. We will never know when or where. We will con­tinue to lay the blame on some­one or some­thing — not that it does much good. God will con­tinue to be with us, and will help us through ev­ery dis­as­ter. The hu­man spirit will rise above each dis­as­ter — we will hope­fully learn from what hap­pened, we will re­build, life will go on, and we will be­come stronger and more de­ter­mined to cre­ate a bet­ter fu­ture for ev­ery­one.

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