How Arkansas’ con­gres­sional del­e­ga­tion voted

Northwest Arkansas Democrat-Gazette - - NATIONAL -

HOUSE

De­lay of air-qual­ity stan­dards.

Ap­proved 229-199, a GOP-spon­sored bill (HR806) that would ex­tend from 2017 to 2025 the dead­line for states to adopt stricter stan­dards un­der the Clean Air Act for re­duc­ing ground-level con­cen­tra­tions of ozone, or smog. This would de­lay an En­vi­ron­men­tal Pro­tec­tion Agency rule that re­quires ozone to be re­duced from 75 parts per bil­lion to 70 ppb by 2017. The bill also changes from five years to 10 years the fre­quency of EPA re­views to en­sure that Na­tional Am­bi­ent Air Qual­ity Stan­dards re­flect the lat­est sci­en­tific and med­i­cal in­for­ma­tion. David McKin­ley, R-W.Va., said ”we all want clean air. But Amer­ica has made great strides al­ready. Ozone is down by one-third since 1980. But the reg­u­la­tions im­posed by Pres­i­dent [Barack] Obama in 2015 would cost the econ­omy bil­lions of dol­lars each year and ham­per job growth.”

Kathy Cas­tor, D-Fla., said: “Ozone, or smog, is a cor­ro­sive gas that forms when emis­sions from smoke­stacks and tailpipes cook in the heat and sun­light. It trig­gers asthma and other res­pi­ra­tory ill­nesses. It is very ex­pen­sive. It is not fair for Repub­li­cans to let polluters off the hook and shift costs to hard­work­ing Amer­i­can fam­i­lies.” A yes vote was to send the bill to the Se­nate.

✔ Rick Craw­ford (R)

✔ French Hill (R)

✔ Steve Wo­mack (R)

✔ Bruce Wester­man (R)

Pro­tec­tions for vul­ner­a­ble pop­u­la­tions.

De­feated 232-194 a bid by Democrats to pre­vent HR806 (above) from fully tak­ing ef­fect if an EPA sci­en­tific ad­vi­sory com­mit­tee con­cludes it would raise health risks to vul­ner­a­ble pop­u­la­tions such as out­door work­ers, chil­dren, se­nior ci­ti­zens, preg­nant women and mi­nor­ity and low-in­come com­mu­ni­ties. Kathy Cas­tor, D-Fla., said: “Ap­prox­i­mately 125 mil­lion Amer­i­cans still live in ar­eas with dan­ger­ous lev­els of air pol­lu­tion. Im­prov­ing ozone stan­dards can help avoid premature deaths, child­hood asthma at­tacks and missed school days.”

John Shimkus, R-Ill., said the bill “en­sures we will con­tinue to de­liver ef­fec­tive en­vi­ron­men­tal pro­tec­tions, with re­forms that will also help ex­pand eco­nomic op­por­tu­nity in com­mu­ni­ties around the na­tion.” A yes vote was to adopt the amend­ment.

✖ Craw­ford (R)

✖ Hill (R)

✖ Wo­mack (R)

✖ Wester­man (R)

Nat­u­ral-gas pipe­line per­mits.

Passed 248-179 a GOP-spon­sored bill (HR2910) that would set tight dead­lines for the Fed­eral En­ergy Reg­u­la­tory Com­mis­sion and other fed­eral and state agen­cies to rule on ap­pli­ca­tions for per­mits to build in­ter­state nat­u­ral-gas pipe­lines. While back­ers said the bill would stream­line an overly bu­reau­cratic process, crit­ics said it would tram­ple on pri­vate and tribal prop­erty rights and un­der­cut en­vi­ron­men­tal laws. In part, the bill would al­low con­di­tional per­mits to be granted on the ba­sis of aerial data col­lected by drones that crit­ics said would fail to de­tect his­tor­i­cal sites, en­dan­gered species and wet­lands. Also un­der the bill, most agency re­views would have to run con­cur­rently and be com­pleted within 90 days.

Bill Flores, R-Texas, said Congress “should mod­ern­ize our pipe­line in­fra­struc­ture to match our abun­dant nat­u­ral-gas re­sources,” so that “all parts of the coun­try can re­al­ize the ben­e­fits of clean, af­ford­able and abun­dant nat­u­ral gas.”

Bobby Rush, D-Ill., said: “Congress should not make it eas­ier for pri­vate com­pa­nies to claim em­i­nent do­main and po­ten­tially [harm] his­tor­i­cal sites, reser­voirs, farms and other pri­vate prop­er­ties.”

A yes vote was to send the bill to the Se­nate.

✔ Craw­ford (R)

✔ Hill (R)

✔ Wo­mack (R)

✔ Wester­man (R)

Cross-bor­der en­ergy pipe­lines.

Ap­proved 254-175 a bill (HR2883) that would end the re­quire­ment that pres­i­dents ap­prove per­mits for oil and nat­u­ral-gas pipe­lines and elec­tric-trans­mis­sion fa­cil­i­ties that cross U.S. bor­ders. The bill au­tho­rizes the Fed­eral En­ergy Reg­u­la­tory Com­mis­sion to is­sue cer­tifi­cates for pipe­lines and the De­part­ment of En­ergy to grant ap­provals for elec­tric­ity lines. De­bate touched on the long-run­ning dis­pute over the Key­stone XL pipe­line through the U.S.-Canada bor­der, which Pres­i­dent Don­ald Trump’s ad­min­is­tra­tion re­cently ap­proved af­ter years of block­age by the Obama ad­min­is­tra­tion on en­vi­ron­men­tal grounds.

Fred Up­ton, R-Mich., said the bill is needed be­cause ”re­cent pro­pos­als, most no­tably the Key­stone XL pipe­line, have faced sig­nif­i­cant and un­nec­es­sary de­lays as a re­sult of po­lit­i­cal in­ter­fer­ence in what should have been a straight­for­ward review.”

Kathy Cas­tor, D-Fla., said: “Tar sands crude is the dirt­i­est fuel on the planet from a cli­mate per­spec­tive, and this bill cre­ates a per­mit­ting process for cross-bor­der pipe­lines that make it dif­fi­cult, if not im­pos­si­ble, for the fed­eral gov­ern­ment to say no to any of these projects.”

A yes vote was to send the bill to the Se­nate.

✔ Craw­ford (R)

✔ Hill (R)

✔ Wo­mack (R)

✔ Wester­man (R)

Amer­i­can-made iron and steel.

Failed 232-193 a Demo­cratic mo­tion re­quir­ing all iron and steel com­po­nents of cross-bor­der pipe­lines ap­proved un­der HR2883 (above) to be made in the United States.

Tom O’Halleran, D-Ariz., said: “We need to re­build Amer­ica’s en­ergy in­fra­struc­ture, but we need to re­build Amer­ica by cre­at­ing Amer­i­can jobs.”

Mark­wayne Mullin, R-Okla., said the mea­sure would “deny the im­por­tant ben­e­fits of this leg­is­la­tion to the Amer­i­can work­ers [and] busi­nesses and our col­lec­tive en­ergy se­cu­rity.”

A yes vote was to adopt a made-in-Amer­ica re­quire­ment.

✖ Craw­ford (R)

✖ Hill (R)

✖ Wo­mack (R)

✖ Wester­man (R)

GOP tax over­haul, Trump re­turns.

Blocked 235-190 a Demo­cratic bid for floor de­bate on a mea­sure that would de­lay the GOP’s planned over­haul of the tax code un­til af­ter Trump has re­leased his per­sonal re­turns for 2006-2015 and busi­ness re­turns or re­turn in­for­ma­tion for the 500plus com­pa­nies world­wide that he ei­ther con­trols or serves in an of­fi­cial ca­pac­ity. As a priv­i­leged res­o­lu­tion, the mea­sure was not de­bat­able. It stated, in part, that the Amer­i­can pub­lic de­serves to know “how any changes to the tax code might fi­nan­cially ben­e­fit the pres­i­dent.”

A yes vote op­posed floor de­bate on whether to com­pel busi­ness and per­sonal tax dis­clo­sures by Trump.

✔ Craw­ford (R)

✔ Hill (R)

✔ Wo­mack (R)

✔ Wester­man (R)

SE­NATE

Pa­trick Shana­han con­fir­ma­tion.

Con­firmed 92-7 Pa­trick Shana­han, a long­time ex­ec­u­tive at The Boe­ing Co., as deputy sec­re­tary of de­fense, the Pen­tagon’s sec­ond-rank­ing po­si­tion. Shana­han headed Boe­ing’s com­mer­cial air­craft and mis­sile-de­fense op­er­a­tions, among other po­si­tions in 31 years with the com­pany.

Jack Reed, D-R.I., said Shana­han would pro­vide “lead­er­ship that the De­part­ment of De­fense needs as our na­tion faces as di­verse an ar­ray of threats and chal­lenges to our na­tional se­cu­rity as at any point in our his­tory.”

No se­na­tor spoke against the nom­i­nee.

A yes vote was to con­firm Shana­han.

✔ John Booz­man (R)

✔ Tom Cot­ton (R)

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.