QUITE THE CATCH

LOB­STER BAR SEA GRILLE BRINGS THE BEST CRUS­TACEANS FROM NOVA SCO­TIA AND BE­YOND TO SOUTH BEACH’S MOST EXCLUSIVE NEIGH­BOR­HOOD.

Ocean Drive - - Contents July/august 2017 - BY CARLA TOR­RES

Lob­ster Bar Sea Grille brings the best crus­taceans from Nova Sco­tia and be­yond to South Beach’s most exclusive neigh­bor­hood.

The set­ting is like some­thing out of a movie: A dap­perly dressed man or­ders a New Old Fash­ioned (with caramelized brown sugar and mar­i­nated black cher­ries) and—for the lady—a Mor­pheus (Bom­bay and St. Germain with laven­der petals and ed­i­ble hi­bis­cus flow­ers). The deep pur­ple tinc­ture within the mar­tini glass, trans­form­ing into white, looks like some­thing out of The Ma­trix, from which the bev­er­age gets its name.

This is the scene at Lob­ster Bar Sea Grille, the first Mi­ami en­deavor for Buck­head Res­tau­rant Group. Lo­cated at the former China Grill space, Lob­ster Bar is the epit­ome of a white-glove seafood house. Pay­ing homage to Grand Cen­tral Sta­tion’s famed Oys­ter Bar in New York, sub­way-tile walls and arched ceil­ings make din­ers feel as if they’re un­der­ground, or aboard an old lux­ury steamship—not in the heart of South Beach bor­der­ing Fifth Street.

Steer­ing the ship is ex­ec­u­tive chef Ar­turo Paz, long no­table from stints at places like Cleo and—back in the day—at oceanic gems Baleen at Grove Isle and A Fish Called Avalon. “I’ve been on the beach since ’91,” he rem­i­nisces. “It’s been in­ter­est­ing to see the meta­mor­pho­sis from when it was com­pletely buzzing in the ’90s to what it is to­day.”

Be­sides stun­ning cock­tails, the star of the show is, of course, the

lob­ster—namely, a one-pounder cooked to per­fec­tion and doused in a mild and but­tery chili sauce. “It’s our sig­na­ture dish,” Paz says. Lightly-fried lob­ster morsels with Greek honey mus­tard aioli are just as lip-smack­ing as the lob­ster bisque au co­gnac. And for the truly ad­ven­tur­ous, a live lob­ster op­tion puts what’s her­alded as the Rolls-royce of lob­sters (up to five-pound crus­taceans from Nova Sco­tia) on the ta­ble in a va­ri­ety of dif­fer­ent prepa­ra­tions, en­sur­ing that the bar and grill lives up to its name.

But you don’t need to or­der lob­ster to en­joy a meal here. Sim­ply turn to the Thas­sos mar­ble fish dis­play­ing the day’s catch—any­thing from fa­mil­iar species like lavraki and fa­gri to the harder-to­come-by John Dory and tur­bot. “We get our fish in fresh ev­ery morn­ing and never know what to ex­pect,” says Paz—though they usu­ally hail from the Mediter­ranean.

Car­ni­vores can go surf-and-turf or full turf with USDA prime filet mignon au poivre, or with a tom­a­hawk that feeds more than two. You’ll want to or­der sides, namely the house spe­cialty lob­ster potato mash. Dessert spares lob­ster, and in­stead de­lights with baba au rhum and Kahlua es­presso mini mar­ti­nis fin­ished with hazelnut cream. Talk about a sweet end­ing. 404 Wash­ing­ton Ave., Mi­ami Beach, 305-3772675; buck­head­restau­rants.com

“WE GET OUR FISH IN FRESH EV­ERY MORN­ING AND NEVER KNOW WHAT TO EX­PECT.” —AR­TURO PAZ

The Chili iob­ster, whose but­tery sauce makes it a sig­na­ture dish at iob­ster Bar Sea drille.

iob­ster Bar’s, well, bar, turns out in­ven­tive cock­tails such as The Mor­pheus (right), which is fla­vored with laven­der and hi­bis­cus.

The turf menu fea­tures bone-in tom­a­hawk steak.

Ex­ec­u­tive chef Ar­turo maz.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.