SANTA FE HAS HAD A LONG RO­MANCE WITH PRECOLUMBIAN AN­TIQ­UI­TIES, AND IN THIS RE­SPECT FREJ IS IN GOOD COM­PANY.

Pasatiempo - - RANDOM ACTS -

Since its in­ven­tion in 1839, sci­en­tists and artists have used pho­tog­ra­phy to make images of the world’s an­tiq­ui­ties, whether found in Egypt, the Mid­dle East, or in the Amer­i­cas. Ar­chae­ol­o­gists used pho­tog­ra­phy to doc­u­ment their finds and Euro­pean colo­nial of­fi­cers made records of the cul­tural, eco­nomic, and de­mo­graphic re­sources of far-flung em­pires. In the Amer­i­cas, pho­tog­ra­phy is in­ti­mately bound to the re­dis­cov­ery of the an­cient Maya. We know that within six months of Louis-Jac­ques-Mandé Da­guerre’s an­nounce­ment of his in­ven­tion of pho­tog­ra­phy, the first da­guerreo­type out­fit was brought to Mex­ico. The Aus­trian diplo­mat Emanuel von Friedrich­sthal took the first pho­to­graphs of Maya ru­ins in 1841, when he vis­ited sites in Cam­peche and Yu­catán. Friedrich­sthal was in­spired by the best­selling account In­ci­dents of Travel in Cen­tral Amer­ica, Chi­a­pas, and Yu­catán (1841), writ­ten by the U.S. at­tor­ney turned travel writer John Lloyd Stephens. The Bri­tish artist Fred­er­ick Cather­wood ac­com­pa­nied Stephens, and his images of Maya ru­ins oc­cupy a foun­da­tional po­si­tion in the his­tory of both ar­chae­o­log­i­cal il­lus­tra­tion and in the his­tory of the way that the Maya have been rep­re­sented by out­siders. When Stephens and Cather­wood set out for Mex­ico on their

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