Worlds Through Words, a poetry read­ing at the Jean Cocteau Cin­ema

Pasatiempo - - PASATIEMPO -

Poet­ica mundi

Ac­tively de­vel­op­ing un­der­stand­ing be­tween cul­tures and among in­di­vid­ual peo­ple of dif­fer­ent back­grounds seems like a moral im­per­a­tive in the cur­rent state of world af­fairs. Be­cause sound, color, im­age, and emo­tion — among other cre­ative de­vices — tran­scend lan­guage bar­ri­ers, art can serve as an aes­thetic bridge that does not rely on con­vey­ing lit­eral mean­ing while pro­mot­ing an ap­pre­ci­a­tion of vastly dif­fer­ent ap­proaches to a medium. For po­ets, such ac­tivism may en­tail find­ing ways to com­mu­ni­cate an in­te­rior world in the con­text of one’s coun­try of ori­gin, fil­ter­ing per­sonal ex­pe­ri­ence through a po­lit­i­cal sen­si­bil­ity, or mak­ing a di­rect call to ac­tion. Four ac­tivist po­ets from dif­fer­ent cul­tures, each with stel­lar in­ter­na­tion­alpub­li­ca­tion and per­for­mance cre­den­tials, of­fer a sam­pler of such di­verse work in Worlds Through Words, a read­ing at 3 p.m. on Sun­day, June 18, at the Jean Cocteau Cin­ema (418 Mon­tezuma Ave., 505-466-5528).

James Aron­hió­tas Stevens (Ak­we­sasne Mo­hawk), who has taught at the In­sti­tute of Amer­i­can In­dian Arts and lives in Lamy, New Mex­ico, is joined by Haleh Liza, a singer and writer with Ira­nian her­itage who has per­formed at Carnegie Hall and the Bon­na­roo Fes­ti­val; Brynn Saito, a Ja­panese-Korean-Amer­i­can who wrote The Palace of Con­tem­plat­ing De­par­ture (2013) and Power Made Us Swoon (2016); and Nige­rian-Amer­i­can poet Uche Nduka, whose col­lec­tions of poetry in­clude Ijele (2012) and Nine East (2013). Ebony Isis Booth, an Al­bu­querque-based slam poet and re­cip­i­ent of West­word’s Mas­ter­Mind Award in Lit­er­ary Arts, hosts the event; in 2016 Booth founded Burque Noir, a mul­ti­me­dia per­for­mance and art show­case of black artists in New Mex­ico. Ad­mis­sion is free. For in­for­ma­tion on Worlds Through Words, visit www.jean­cocteaucin­ema.com. — J.L.

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