SPEAKER OUT

Where do you draw the line be­tween teas­ing and bul­ly­ing?

Santa Fe New Mexican - - GENERATION MEXT - COM­PILED BY SYD­NEY POPE AND NIVEDITHA BALA/GEN­ER­A­TION NEXT

Lucinda Pa­trus, Santa Fe Prep

“I think bul­ly­ing is when a per­son takes it to heart and is af­fected by it in a way that hurts a per­son’s feel­ings. Teas­ing is meant to be used as a joke about some­thing that some­one said. Bul­ly­ing is where [one] takes things and uses them to hurt peo­ple’s feel­ings.”

Tyler Bid­dleAx­el­rod, Santa Fe Prep

“Teas­ing is more of a play­ful con­text than bul­ly­ing. Bul­ly­ing is in­ten­tion­ally try­ing to be mean.”

Josh Wertheim, Santa Fe Prep

“I think the line should be drawn when you think about what some­one said when they were teas­ing you af­ter it hap­pened.”

Alex Ben­itez, Man­dela In­ter­na­tional Mag­net School

“Teas­ing is when you’re just mess­ing with some­one and it’s small, but bul­ly­ing is when it gets big­ger and worse. … Bul­ly­ing can lead to sui­cide, while teas­ing is play­ing around with some­one.” Sheyenne Hoskisson, Man­dela In­ter­na­tional Mag­net School “Teas­ing is some­thing meant as a joke. It’s fun. It’s some­thing that if the per­son doesn’t like it, the one teas­ing will stop. Teas­ing is a joke. Bul­ly­ing is some­thing meant to cause harm. …”

Shelby P., Man­dela In­ter­na­tional Mag­net School

“The line be­tween teas­ing and bul­ly­ing is de­pen­dent on a few vari­ables. These are friend­ship and con­tent. It’s teas­ing if your friend is mak­ing a lit­tle joke or jab that doesn’t make you un­com­fort­able, no one’s feel­ings are hurt and it might get a laugh. How­ever, if it’s some­one you don’t know very well or some­one is de­lib­er­ately try­ing to hurt your feel­ings, it is most likely bul­ly­ing.”

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