KILLER COY­OTE

Fab­ri­cat­ing the Heart and Soul of a Preda­tor

Street Trucks - - CONTENTS - TEXT BY JOHN MATA JR. PHO­TOS BY BRIAN GOUDE

LUKASZ GAINICY (PRO­NOUNCED LU-KA-ZIE) HAS EATEN, SLEPT AND BREATHED EV­ERY AS­PECT OF CUS­TOM VE­HI­CLES SINCE HE WAS A BOY GROW­ING UP IN LAN­CASTER, CAL­I­FOR­NIA. His fa­ther had been an award-win­ning cus­tomizer since the ’60s, and Lukasz ben­e­fit­ted from watch­ing and learn­ing from his dad. Lukasz has also had the op­por­tu­nity to work along­side hot rod greats like Gene Win­field, where he learned and ex­celled in the arts of metal fab­ri­ca­tion, weld­ing, paint and body­work. In 2000, Lukasz started his own fab­ri­ca­tion shop, Need­fulth­ingz Hot Rods, where he’s been build­ing knock­out ve­hi­cles of all kinds from the ground up while keep­ing his fin­ger on the pulse of the South­ern Cal­i­for­nia cus­tom scene.

SIMPLY CRE­AT­ING A VIS­UALLY IM­PRES­SIVE TRUCK THAT SHINES BRIGHT AND SITS LOW WASN’T GO­ING TO CUT IT. LUKASZ AND CHRIS PUT A PLAN INTO AC­TION TO BUILD A TRUCK THAT HIT THE MARKS OF A TRUE RESTO-MOD/PRO-TOUR­ING PICKUP WITH A ONE-OFF BED AND ALL OF THE PRE­MIUM BELLS AND WHIS­TLES.”

Through­out the years

Lukasz has signed his name to nu­mer­ous high-pro­file builds for a list of clien­tele that has come to bank on the level of qual­ity he de­liv­ers. In 2014, Chris Beatty, also of Lan­caster, ap­proached Lukasz to build his holy grail ’55 Ford F-100 project. Chris wasn’t af­ter a sim­ple restora­tion job; he wanted some­thing with more sub­stance, a clas­sic pickup that not only cap­tured the true soul of a vin­tage Amer­i­can truck, but one that fea­tured all of the con­ve­niences of a mod­ern-day street rod with a unique twist un­like any­thing else on the show cir­cuit. The Coy­ote F-100 seen here is the di­rect prod­uct of Lukasz’s hours of tire­less re­search and de­vel­op­ment. The ’55 was a plat­form to ex­er­cise his tried-and-true fab­ri­ca­tion meth­ods while he pushed his bound­aries be­yond any­thing he’d ever built be­fore.

Simply cre­at­ing a vis­ually im­pres­sive truck that shines bright and sits low wasn’t go­ing to cut it. Lukasz and Chris put a plan into ac­tion to build a truck that hit the marks of a true resto-mod/pro-tour­ing pickup

with a one-off bed and all of the pre­mium bells and whis­tles. Chris, be­ing a crafts­man in his own right, could en­vi­sion all of the ideas Lukasz was send­ing his way, which con­trib­uted sig­nif­i­cantly to the build’s suc­cess.

From the be­gin­ning, a 5.0L Ford Rac­ing Coy­ote en­gine was a top pri­or­ity. The guys wanted the truck to gen­er­ate raw speed with the ag­gres­sive prow­ess that Wile E. Coy­ote could only have imag­ined in his ef­fort to catch the Roadrunner. To cap­i­tal­ize on the Coy­ote en­gine’s pow­er­ful abil­i­ties, Lukasz worked a Kenne Bell 3.2 su­per­charged blower into the equa­tion, as well as an AEM In­fin­ity stand­alone en­gine man­age­ment sys­tem to dial it all in. Mag­naflow head­ers and a cus­tom 3-inch ex­haust sys­tem were en­gi­neered to hug the truck’s cus­tom frame (which we will touch on in a minute) to gen­er­ate an in­tim­i­dat­ing growl.

Aside from hav­ing a truck built for speed, Chris also wanted his F-100 to sit as low to the ground as pos­si­ble, while main­tain­ing enough agility to

KEEP YOUR EYES OPEN AT SHOWS OR ON THE ROAD THIS SUM­MER BE­CAUSE THE COY­OTE WILL BE MAK­ING ITS ROUNDS. AS FOR LUKASZ, HE HAS EN­JOYED CRE­AT­ING AN­OTHER CUS­TOM VE­HI­CLE THAT HAS BEEN WELL RE­CEIVED BY ITS OWNER AND THE GEN­ERAL TRUCK-LOV­ING PUB­LIC. ”

har­ness the power out­put of the Coy­ote en­gine. In or­der to build a sus­pen­sion sys­tem that could de­liver, Lukasz be­gan by first build­ing a cus­tom-boxed and Z’d frame as a foundation for the chas­sis setup. From there, a Mustang II front clip and rear up­side down triangulated 4-link, com­plete with an ad­justable weight cantilever dis­tri­bu­tion, were in­tro­duced to the new frame. Fox shocks as­sist in soft­en­ing the blows from the road, and Ac­cuair air man­age­ment helps or­ches­trate the air ride sys­tem con­sist­ing of top-shelf wares like the Slam Spe­cial­ties ’bags and air man­i­fold and dual Air Zenith air com­pres­sors. As far as rolling gear for the chas­sis, Lukasz felt it nec­es­sary to stick with rea­son­able wheel di­am­e­ters for the In­tro wheels in front, but he did splurge a bit with the 15-inch-wide rear wheels. That’s a lot of meat for a truck like this to stuff un­der­neath the bed, but he fit them in per­fectly.

When it came to the F-100’s ex­te­rior, sim­plic­ity reigned supreme. Aside from shav­ing some ne­ces­si­ties from the truck’s sur­face—door han­dles, rain gut­ters, vents and em­blems—there re­ally hasn’t been much added to the façade. The front grille re­ceived a pretty rad­i­cal restyling, as did the rear, with its molded tail­gate and Chevro­let Cobalt tail­lights frenched into the rear fenders. The real shin­ing bea­con on the Ford’s ex­te­rior, how­ever, is the amaz­ing bed floor. The con­toured bed floor not only fea­tures a lux­u­ri­ous com­bi­na­tion of wal­nut and maple, but the en­tire floor lifts up via ac­tu­a­tor, ex­pos­ing the pow­der-coated frame and chas­sis com­po­nents. Lukasz wanted to cre­ate a one-off bed in the past, and the F-100 was the ideal op­por­tu­nity to pull out all the stops.

The level of ex­e­cu­tion did not wa­ver in­side the cab.

Lukasz crafted a four-point re­in­forced roll cage to grace the in­te­rior space and stuck with the per­for­mance theme by in­cor­po­rat­ing leather-cov­ered Sparco rac­ing seats ex­pertly wrapped by San­tos Up­hol­stery. The same wal­nut and maple used on the bed floor also adorns the cab in the form of a cus­tom cen­ter con­sole and door pan­els that house au­dio gear and the Ac­cuair e-level con­troller. One-off

“CB” (for owner Chris Beatty) mono­grammed ma­te­rial wraps the door panel and head­liner for a sub­tle, per­son­al­ized touch. The plush con­fines of the in­te­rior com­ple­ment the rest of the truck’s stream­lined yet highly mod­i­fied style.

One theme that the truck has go­ing for it is the use of the let­ter “W” through­out. There is a “W” em­blem in the front grille, un­der the bed floor and on the seats, as well as lay­ered in the mono­grammed ma­te­rial used in the in­te­rior. The “W” rep­re­sents Wile E. Coy­ote be­cause Lukasz imag­ined the truck had been built like Wile E. would have wanted it to best the Roadrunner. It’s been decked out with high-per­for­mance prod­ucts that pro­mote sheer power and su­pe­rior han­dling. All other up­grades can be chalked up to the pure style and grace of a so­phis­ti­cated preda­tor on the prowl.

Keep your eyes open at shows or on the road this sum­mer be­cause The Coy­ote will be mak­ing its rounds. As for Lukasz, he has en­joyed cre­at­ing an­other cus­tom ve­hi­cle that has been well re­ceived by its owner and the gen­eral truck-lov­ing pub­lic. Make sure to follow the Need­fulth­ingz shop ac­count on your so­cial me­dia out­let of choice to see what he builds next. What­ever it is, it’s sure to be killer.

THE L.A. SUN­SET WAS PER­FECT FOR SHOOT­ING THIS KILLERLOOKING FORD-COYOTEPOWERED F-100. IT’S HARD NOT TO TAKE PER­FECT PIC­TURES OF THIS AMAZ­ING TRUCK.

ABOVE. AN UP­SIDE DOWN TRIANGULATED 4-LINK WITH AN AD­JUSTABLE WEIGHT CANTILEVER DIS­TRI­BU­TION, WERE ADDED TO THE NEW FRAME IN THE REAR.

LEFT. THE SAME WAL­NUT AND MAPLE USED ON THE BED FLOOR WAS USED FOR THE CUS­TOM CEN­TER CON­SOLE AND DOOR PAN­ELS.

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