Pink and baby blue, all grown up

The Denver Post - - LIFE & CULTURE - By Lindsey M. Roberts

In 2016, Pan­tone in­vites you to re­con­sider your feel­ings about pale pink and blue. In­stead of re­mem­ber­ing them as stuffy or rel­e­gat­ing them to nurs­eries, Leatrice Eise­man, ex­ec­u­tive di­rec­tor for Pan­tone Color In­sti­tute, sug­gests pair­ing the pas­tel “col­ors of the year,” Rose Quartz and Seren­ity, with the bold col­ors of re­cent years. It will make both feel fresh.

As the world’s fore­most color trend watcher, Eise­man had no­ticed blush pink and a soft peri­win­kle blue pop­ping up on run­ways and in in­te­ri­ors, but it was a ret­ro­spec­tive for 20th- cen­tury Amer­i­can painter Agnes Martin at the TateModern in Lon­don that ar­rested her at­ten­tion. “I was just taken aback,” Eise­man says of Martin’s work, which used pale color washes in ab­stract forms. “It was an un­ex­pected us­age of color in a grid or in strip­ings, and yet it has this quiet, soft invit­ing feel about it.”

But it’s the pair­ing of th­ese soft pas­tels with other col­ors that re­ally has Eise­man jazzed. Take a rich choco­late or mod­ern aubergine, for ex­am­ple, and add a blush pink or a lighter blue ( don’t stress over­match­ing Rose Quartz and Seren­ity ex­actly), and you have some­thing new­for the newyear, a fresh start. And isn’t thatwhat trends are all about?

Ideas for adding th­ese tones to your decor:

• Sea & Asters’ Blush + Wood mini wood col­or­block planter adds a dash of pink to a desk or table­top ($ 22, seaan­dasters. com). “Step out­side of the mind- set of blue for boys and pink for girls,” Eise­man says. “Th­ese are not weak baby col­ors. They have a bit more strength than that, and more to say.”

• Hue Din­ner Plates in blush or blue can stand on their own as a set— pink on pink, blue on blue — or can be mixed and matched ($ 6, crate­and­bar­rel. com). Monochro­matic or poly­chro­matic, “it’s all in the com­bi­na­tion,” Eise­man says. Also in­cluded in the Hue col­lec­tion: salad plates, mugs and bowls.

• Sa­man­tha Fried­man, an in­te­rior de­signer in Bethesda, Md., sug­gests us­ing pas­tels in ac­ces­sories and other items that are easy to change out, such as bed­ding. Re­place con­ven­tional white sheets with Area Home’s An­ton Pink cot­ton per­cale ($ 70-$ 145, lekker­home. com). Want more pink? Pair the sheets with the Sally Blan­ket ($ 180-$ 235).

• “I have no­ticed a move­ment in the last cou­ple of years to­ward lighter, airier in­te­ri­ors,” Eise­man says. If your din­ing room is feel­ing too heavy, re­fresh it with a lighter- col­ored set of chairs, such as the ParisWood Side Chairs by Aeon Fur­ni­ture ($ 92 for two, way­fair. com).

• Fried­man likes Kate Spade New York’sWood­grain Rug, which gives the faux bois pat­tern trend a fem­i­nine touch ($ 700-$ 2,075, kates­pade. com). It will add sub­tle color to a mostly white bed­room, soften a blackand­white liv­ing room or tone down a vi­brant fam­ily room.

• Use Rose Quartz and Seren­ity not only with bold col­ors and neu­trals, but also with each other. “Blue says one thing, and rose says an­other. But when you bring them to­gether, they in­ten­sify each other,” she says. “It’s like the per­fect mar­riage.” Find them to­gether in Zara Home’s Pas­tel Blue Polka- Dot Bol­ster ($ 50, zara­home. com).

• Trends are like sea­sons: They feed our de­sire for va­ri­ety and change. But if change comes slowly for you, “the table­top is a won­der­ful place to ex­per­i­ment with color,” Eise­man says. Start with a sky blue or blush 1- Com­part­ment Cafe­te­ria Tray and cre­ate a com­pelling vi­gnette ($ 24, school­house­elec­tric. com).

• The pe­tite, pow­der­coated Wally Task Lamp is Fried­man’s pick for night­stands or desks, in blush or pale blue ($ 69, west­elm. com). The diminu­tive size means that the color will add a sub­tle sense of calm to a bed­room.

• If you had any doubt that pas­tels could read mod­ern, check out Ferm Liv­ing’s bir­chan­doak Large Spear Tray ($ 120, burkedecor. com). Dusty rose meets navy meets sea- foam green meets olive green.

• More and more of Fried­man’s clients are re­quest­ing a white pal­ette and neu­tral decor, turn­ing away from the bold col­ors of re­cent years. “I think peo­ple want more of a neu­tral pal­ette against which to dec­o­rate,” Fried­man says. Try light col­ors in an om­bre fash­ion with the Bot­tle Grinder SpiceMill Set ($ 60, leif­shop. com). “Nude” pairs a light pink and peach; “blue” pairs cloud and storm blue. The set can grind spices, grains and seeds as well as salt and pep­per.

Ferm Liv­ing

If you had any doubt that pas­tels could read mod­ern, check out Ferm Liv­ing’s birch- and- oak Large Spear Tray ($ 120). Sea & Asters’ Blush + Wood mini wood col­or­block planter adds just a dash of pink to a desk or table­top ($ 22). Sea & Asters

Way­fair. com

If your din­ing room is feel­ing too heavy, re­fresh it with a lighter- col­ored set of chairs, such as the ParisWood Side Chairs by Aeon Fur­ni­ture ($ 92

for two).

School­house Elec­tric & Sup­ply

The table­top is a great place to ex­per­i­ment with color com­bi­na­tions. School­house Elec­tric & Sup­ply’s 1Com­part­ment Cafe­te­ria Tray comes in five col­ors, in­clud­ing blush and sky blue ($ 24).

Re­place con­ven­tional white sheets with Area Home’s An­ton Pink cot­ton per­cale ($ 70-$ 145). Want more pink? Pair the sheets with the Sally Blan­ket. Area Home

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