ALASKA CLEARED TO BUY VIR­GIN

The Denver Post - - BUSINESS -

Alaska Air­lines has won gov­ern­ment ap­proval to buy ri­val Vir­gin Amer­ica af­ter agree­ing to re­duce its flight-sell­ing part­ner­ship with Amer­i­can Air­lines.

Par­ent com­pany Alaska Air Group Inc. said Tues­day that it ex­pects to close the $2.6 bil­lion deal soon.

Seat­tle-based Alaska is the na­tion’s sixth-big­gest air­line, and Cal­i­for­nia-based Vir­gin is eighth. To­gether, they will be­come the fifth­biggest. Both air­lines pro­vide ser­vice at Den­ver In­ter­na­tional Air­port.

Wild Rose Mar­ket­ing ac­quired. Chicagob­ased

C.A. For­tune has ac­quired Boul­der’s Wild Rose Mar­ket­ing, ac­cord­ing to a state­ment from the com­pany.

“Bring­ing Wild Rose Mar­ket­ing into the C.A. For­tune fam­ily adds com­plete cov­er­age of Colorado, Utah, New Mex­ico and Wy­oming and gets us closer to our goal of build­ing the best-in-class na­tional pri­vately-held nat­u­ral, spe­cialty, and bak­ery/ deli agency in the coun­try,” C.A. For­tune man­ag­ing part­ner Tyler Low­ell said.

For­tune said it plans to move the firm to Den­ver and that founder Rose Pierro will re­main with the com­pany in a lead­er­ship role

U.S. pro­duc­tiv­ity up 3.1%. The pro­duc­tiv­ity

of Amer­i­can work­ers rose in the July-Septem­ber quar­ter at the fastest pace in two years while la­bor costs slowed af­ter a big jump in the spring.

Pro­duc­tiv­ity in­creased in the third quar­ter at a 3.1 per­cent rate, the La­bor De­part­ment re­ported Tues­day. That fol­lowed three quar­terly de­clines and was the best show­ing since the third quar­ter of 2014. La­bor costs edged up at a 0.7 per­cent rate in the third quar­ter fol­low­ing a much faster 6.2 per­cent jump in the se­cond quar­ter.

Google hits re­new­able en­ergy goal. Google

says that be­gin­ning next year, it be­lieves it will have amassed enough re­new­able en­ergy to meet all of its elec­tric­ity needs through­out the world.

That’s sig­nif­i­cant, given Google’s rav­en­ous ap­petite for elec­tric­ity to power its of­fices and the huge data cen­ters that process re­quests for its ser­vices.

Google won’t be able to power its op­er­a­tions solely on wind and solar power. But it may be in a po­si­tion to off­set ev­ery megawatt hour of elec­tric­ity supplied by a power plant run­ning on fos­sil fu­els with re­new­able en­ergy.

Ka­t­rina-fraud ver­dict against State Farm up­held. A unan­i­mous

Supreme Court on Tues­day up­held a jury ver­dict that State Farm Fire and Ca­su­alty Co. com­mit­ted fraud against the fed­eral gov­ern­ment af­ter 2005’s Hur­ri­cane Ka­t­rina.

The jus­tices on Tues­day re­jected claims by State Farm that the whistle­blower case against the in­surer should have been dis­missed be­cause its ex­is­tence was leaked while it was sup­posed to be se­cret.

Sis­ters Cori and Kerry Rigsby filed the fraud law­suit on be­half of the gov­ern­ment af­ter they said they wit­nessed State Farm shift­ing Mis­sis­sippi claims to fed­eral flood in­sur­ance that should have been paid by pri­vate wind in­sur­ance.

Lego names new CEO.

Lego an­nounced Tues­day that its CEO, who has led the Dan­ish com­pany for 12 years, will be re­placed by an­other com­pany ex­ec­u­tive.

Lego said that 60year-old Bali Padda will take over Jan. 1 from Jo­er­gen Vig Knud­storp, who will head up a new en­tity within the group. Padda, the cur­rent chief op­er­a­tions of­fi­cer, joined Lego in 2002.

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