HOW DOES BRI­TAIN FILE FOR DI­VORCE?

The Denver Post - - BUSINESS -

The bill passed by Par­lia­ment late Mon­day au­tho­rizes the Bri­tish gov­ern­ment to in­voke Ar­ti­cle 50 of the EU’s Lis­bon Treaty, which says a mem­ber state may “no­tify the Euro­pean Coun­cil of its in­ten­tion” to leave the bloc.

Later this month, May is ex­pected to send the no­ti­fi­ca­tion

On the Bri­tish side, Davis will take the lead, re­port­ing to May. Bri­tain’s am­bas­sador to the EU, Tim Bar­row, also

Bri­tain’s vote to leave the EU has meant un­cer­tainty for 3 mil­lion EU cit­i­zens liv­ing in the U.K., and 1 mil­lion Bri­tons who re­side in the 27 other na­tions of the bloc. Both sides agree that pro­vid­ing a guar­an­tee that they will be able to stay where

Un­der the terms of Ar­ti­cle 50, Bri­tain will cease to be an EU mem­ber in March 2019.

But EU ne­go­tia­tors warn it could take two years just to

The Bri­tish gov­ern­ment has said firmly that it will not back­track on Brexit. But it’s un­clear whether Ar­ti­cle 50 is legally re­versible. Former Bri­tish am­bas­sador to the EU John Kerr, who wrote Ar­ti­cle 50, says “it is not ir­rev­o­ca­ble. You can change your mind while the process is go­ing on.”

How­ever, do­mes­tic pres­sures make it un­likely that the Bri­tish gov­ern­ment would try a U-turn. May prob­a­bly will take her cue from a catch phrase of pre­de­ces­sor Mar­garet Thatcher: “The lady’s not for turn­ing.”

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