PROS­E­CU­TORS PUSH TO AR­REST OUSTED PRES­I­DENT

The Denver Post - - NEWS -

seoul, south korea» South Korean pros­e­cu­tors said Mon­day that they want to ar­rest for­mer Pres­i­dent Park Geun-hye over the cor­rup­tion al­le­ga­tions that trig­gered a huge po­lit­i­cal scan­dal and top­pled her from power.

The move comes af­ter pros­e­cu­tors grilled Park for 14 hours last week over sus­pi­cions that she col­luded with a jailed con­fi­dante to ex­tort from com­pa­nies and com­mit­ted other wrong­do­ing when she was in of­fice.

The Seoul pros­e­cu­tors’ of­fice said it asked a lo­cal court to is­sue an ar­rest war­rant for Park. The Seoul Cen­tral District Court said it would hold a hear­ing Thurs­day to de­cide on the pros­e­cu­tors’ re­quest.

Red Bull heir en­joys jet-set life four years af­ter hit-and-run

B bangkok» It took just hours to find the Fer­rari driver who al­legedly slammed into a cop, dragged him along the road and sped away from the man­gled body. In­ves­ti­ga­tors fol­lowed a drip, drip, drip trail of brake fluid up a street, down an al­ley and into the gated es­tate of one of Thai­land’s rich­est fam­i­lies.

The pros­e­cu­tion of Red Bull heir Vo­rayuth “Boss” Yoovid­hya, how­ever, has been de­layed for close to five years. The times when Vo­rayuth has been called in on charges, he hasn’t shown up, claim­ing through his at­tor­ney that he was sick or out of the coun­try on busi­ness. And while statutes of lim­i­ta­tions run out on key charges this year, it’s been widely as­sumed that he’s hid­ing, pos­si­bly abroad, or liv­ing a quiet lo­cal life, only go­ing out in dis­guise. He isn’t. Within weeks of the ac­ci­dent, The As­so­ci­ated Press has found, Vo­rayuth, then 27, was back to en­joy­ing his fam­ily’s jet-set life, largely as­so­ci­ated with the Red Bull brand, an en­ergy drink com­pany co-founded by his grand­fa­ther. He flies around the world on pri­vate Red Bull jets, cheers the com­pany’s For­mula One rac­ing team from Red Bull’s VIP seats and keeps a black Porsche Car­rera in Lon­don with cus­tom li­cense plates: B055 RBR. Boss Red Bull Rac­ing.

Oil is in pipe­line un­der Mis­souri River reser­voir. The Dakota Ac­cess

pipe­line de­vel­oper said Mon­day that it has placed oil in the pipe­line un­der a Mis­souri River reser­voir in North Dakota and that it’s pre­par­ing to put the pipe­line into ser­vice. Dal­las-based En­ergy Trans­fer Part­ners made the an­nounce­ment in a brief court fil­ing with the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. The an­nounce­ment marks a sig­nif­i­cant de­vel­op­ment in the long bat­tle over the project that will move North Dakota oil 1,172 miles through South Dakota and Iowa to a ship­ping point in Illinois.

ICE: Rape sus­pect’s fa­ther ar­rested af­ter im­mi­gra­tion re­view B

jes­sup, md.» Im­mi­gra­tion of­fi­cials say the fa­ther of a high school stu­dent charged with rap­ing a 14-yearold girl in a school bath­room in Mary­land has been ar­rested af­ter a re­view of his sta­tus in the United States.

Ac­cord­ing to me­dia re­ports, a spokes­woman for U.S. Im­mi­gra­tion and Cus­toms En­force­ment said in a state­ment Mon­day that 43-year-old Adolfo Sanchez-Reyes was ar­rested Fri­day. She says a re­view of Sanchez-Reyes’ im­mi­gra­tion his­tory shows that he is in the United States il­le­gally. Of­fi­cials say SanchezReyes and his son, 18-year-old Henry Sanchez, are Gu­atemalans.

Henry Sanchez and 17-year-old Jose Mon­tano were charged with rap­ing a stu­dent at Rockville High School on March 16.

State Se­nate passes res­o­lu­tion to move Polk’s body B

nashville, tenn.» The Ten­nessee Se­nate has passed a res­o­lu­tion that would al­low the body of for­mer Pres­i­dent James K. Polk to be ex­humed and moved to a fourth rest­ing place.

Polk and his wife, Sarah, are buried on the grounds of the state Capi­tol. The res­o­lu­tion would al­low the bod­ies to be ex­humed and moved about 50 miles south to Columbia to the grounds of the James K. Polk Home and Mu­seum. It passed 20-6 on Mon­day.

The pro­posal has riled some folks in Ten­nessee, who think the move des­e­crates the body of the na­tion’s 11th pres­i­dent. Oth­ers be­lieve the move would more ap­pro­pri­ately honor the pres­i­dent who played a cen­tral role in helping ex­pand the U.S. across the con­ti­nent.

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