Briefs BICYCLIST DIES IN COL­LI­SION WITH SUV

The Denver Post - - NEWS -

LOVE­LAND» A 71-year old man on a bi­cy­cle was killed Mon­day af­ter­noon af­ter he col­lided with a sport util­ity ve­hi­cle while at­tempt­ing to change lanes, po­lice said.

The Love­land man was trav­el­ing north on his bike on North Taft Av­enue a lit­tle af­ter 2:20 p.m. when he at­tempted to move into the left-hand turn lane to turn onto West 50th Street, po­lice said. The cy­clist didn’t see a Ford Es­cape in the pass­ing lane to his left and struck the ve­hi­cle in the right front pas­sen­ger side, ac­cord­ing to author­i­ties.

The bicyclist, whose name has not been re­leased, was trans­ported to the Med­i­cal Cen­ter of the Rock­ies, where he died from his in­juries.

The Es­cape was driven by a 26-year-old man from Fort Collins, po­lice said. Speed, al­co­hol and drugs are not sus­pected.

Wit­nesses are asked to call Love­land po­lice Of­fi­cer Justin Loren­zen at 970-667- 2151.

Jury de­lib­er­at­ing fate of for­mer sher­iff Maketa. COLORADO

SPRINGS» A jury is de­lib­er­at­ing the fate of a for­mer sher­iff charged with ex­tor­tion and wit­ness tam­per­ing.

The Gazette re­ports jurors be­gan de­lib­er­at­ing Mon­day af­ter­noon in the case in­volv­ing for­mer El Paso County Sher­iff Terry Maketa.

The 52-year-old for­mer law­man is ac­cused of try­ing to un­der­mine the cred­i­bil­ity of three deputies and threat­en­ing to ter­mi­nate a $5.3 mil­lion con­tract with the jail’s health provider if it did not fire an em­ployee who re­fused to sup­port then-Un­der­sh­er­iff Paula Pres­ley’s can­di­dacy to suc­ceed him.

Pros­e­cu­tors also say Maketa and oth­ers co­erced a wo­man in­volved in a do­mes­tic dis­pute with a deputy to re­cant her story so the deputy could keep his job.

Maketa de­clined to take the stand in his own de­fense.

In-town deer hunt pro­posed to thin ur­ban herd. CAÑON CITY»

The in-town deer herd is grow­ing — as is the num­ber of calls from peo­ple com­plain­ing about the an­i­mals.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife of­fi­cers Zach Holder and Bob Carochi told Cañon City’s coun­cil that thin­ning the herd may be the only way to slow the con­flicts be­tween deer and dogs and re­duce the haz­ard deer pose to mo­torists.

“The best way for our agency to man­age the wildlife pop­u­la­tion is through hunt­ing prac­tices,” Holder said. “We need to do a har­vest on those an­i­mals. Oth­er­wise you’re go­ing to see an ex­po­nen­tial growth ev­ery year.”

He said the deer have no nat­u­ral preda­tors in town, they face no hunt­ing pres­sure and the win­ters are light and min­i­mal. Most of the deer mor­tal­i­ties are from ve­hi­cle col­li­sions, Carochi said. Track­ing col­lars have been placed on some deer to see if they are stay­ing in town or leav­ing. One doe has wan­dered only about a mile out­side town be­fore com­ing back in re­cent years. Staff and wire re­ports

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from USA

© PressReader. All rights reserved.