MAN DIES WHEN AIR BAG RUP­TURES DUR­ING CAR RE­PAIR

The Denver Post - - BUSINESS -

DETROIT» An­other per­son has been killed in the U.S. by an ex­plod­ing Takata air bag in­fla­tor, but this death wasn’t the re­sult of a crash.

Honda says a man died in June 2016 when an in­fla­tor rup­tured while he was work­ing in­side a 2001 Honda Ac­cord us­ing a ham­mer.

The car’s ig­ni­tion switch was on, so the air bag would have been ready in case of a crash. But it’s not clear why the air bag de­ployed, the com­pany said. Po­lice pho­tos show the me­tal in­fla­tor rup­tured and shot out frag­ments in Hialeah, Fla., near Mi­ami.

“The rup­ture most likely con­trib­uted to his death,” Honda spokesman Chris Martin said.

It’s the 12th U.S. death at­trib­uted to the faulty inflators and the 17th world­wide.

Siemens says Rus­sia sent tur­bines to Crimea. BER­LIN» Ger­many’s Siemens AG says at least two gas tur­bines de­liv­ered to Rus­sia were re-routed to Crimea, in vi­o­la­tion both of Euro­pean sanc­tions and a con­tract with the com­pany.

Siemens told the dpa news agency Mon­day the Rus­sian cus­tomer, who was not iden­ti­fied, had con­firmed mul­ti­ple times in writ­ing that the tur­bines would not go to Ukraine’s Crimean penin­sula, which was an­nexed by Rus­sia in 2014.

Pros­e­cu­tors in­ves­ti­gat­ing Porsche. BER­LIN» Ger­man pros­e­cu­tors say they’ve opened an in­ves­ti­ga­tion into em­ploy­ees of Porsche, which is a unit of Volk­swa­gen AG, and an Amer­i­can sub­sidiary over the pos­si­ble ma­nip­u­la­tion of diesel emis­sions.

Stuttgart pros­e­cu­tors said Mon­day they are in­ves­ti­gat­ing sus­pi­cions of fraud and mak­ing false claims.

Amer­i­cans bor­rowed more in May. Amer­i­can con­sumers in­creased their bor­row­ing in May at the fastest pace in six months, re­flect­ing a sharp rebound in the cat­e­gory that in­cludes credit cards. The Fed­eral Re­serve re­ports to­tal con­sumer bor­row­ing rose by $18.4 bil­lion in May, the strong­est gain since a $25.1 bil­lion in­crease in Novem­ber.

Ibe­ria air­line drops preg­nancy test for new work­ers. MADRID» Spain’s Ibe­ria air­line has de­cided to scrap a preg­nancy test for new em­ploy­ees af­ter it was fined $29,000 by a re­gional govern­ment for dis­crim­i­na­tion.

The air­line said Mon­day that the test had been purely a pre­cau­tion­ary mea­sure taken in the in­ter­est of the baby and fu­ture mother, and de­nied that it re­jected preg­nant women for jobs.

News out­lets want to ne­go­ti­ate with Google, Face­book on ads. News out­lets are seek­ing per­mis­sion from Con­gress for the right to ne­go­ti­ate jointly with Google and Face­book, two com­pa­nies that dom­i­nate on­line ad­ver­tis­ing and on­line news traf­fic. The News Me­dia Al­liance, which rep­re­sents nearly 2,000 news or­ga­ni­za­tions, says be­cause of those two com­pa­nies’ dom­i­nance, news pub­lish­ers are forced to “play by their rules.”

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