Pork is an­other great op­tion for schnitzel

Pork is a great op­tion for schnitzel

The Morning Journal (Lorain, OH) - - FRONT PAGE - By Katie Work­man Katie Work­man has writ­ten two cook­books fo­cused on easy, fam­ily-friendly cook­ing, “Din­ner Solved!” and “The Mom 100 Cook­book.”

Sch­nitzels are of­ten made with veal or chicken, but pork is a great al­ter­na­tive. Make it with this great recipe.

Sch­nitzels are of­ten made with veal or chicken, but pork is a great al­ter­na­tive. Pound­ing out the cut­lets makes them even thin­ner and more ten­der, so they cook up quickly, per­fect for a week­night meal. And there’s that ir­re­sistible crunch from the Panko bread-crumb coat­ing. This is one of those heart­en­ing dishes that’s pop­u­lar with both kids and adults.

The tangy, quickly pick­led cu­cum­bers and onions make a great coun­ter­point to the lightly fried pork cut­lets. You could def­i­nitely use dried dill in­stead of fresh if it’s eas­ier.

Also, yes, they’re called seed­less cu­cum­bers, but of course there are still a nom­i­nal amount of seeds in them. Re­mov­ing the seeds gives the salad a nicer tex­ture, without the slightly slimy con­sis­tency of the seeds, and helps re­duce any wa­ter­i­ness in the salad.

A lit­tle tip: Dou­ble the cu­cum­ber salad next time you are serv­ing a bagel and smoked sal­mon spread — it’s a great side for a brunch of any sort, es­pe­cially as a foil to smoked fish. Kosher salt and freshly ground pep­per to taste

2 tea­spoons finely minced fresh thyme

2 to 4 ta­ble­spoons olive oil

IN­STRUC­TIONS Slice the cu­cum­ber in half length­wise, use a tea­spoon to scoop out the seeds, and slice the cu­cum­bers into thin half­moons.

Place the sliced cu­cum­ber and the onion in a colan­der and toss with the salt. Let sit for 10 min­utes, then rinse the cu­cum­ber and onion in very cold water and, us­ing your hands, squeeze the veg­eta­bles to re­move as much water as pos­si­ble. Place the cu­cum­ber mix­ture in a clean dish­towel, roll up, and twist and squeeze to re­move as much water as pos­si­ble again.

In a serv­ing bowl, stir to­gether the vine­gar, sugar, dill and pep­per. Add the cu­cum­ber and onion and toss to com­bine. Hold in the fridge.

Place each pork chop be­tween two pieces of plas­tic wrap and use a rolling pin (or bot­tle of wine) to gen­tly pound the pork chops un­til they are of an even thick­ness be­tween ¼- and 1⁄3inch thick.

Place the flour in a shal­low bowl, the milk in an­other shal­low bowl, and the Panko bread crumbs in a third shal­low bowl. Sea­son the flour and the milk lightly with salt and pep­per. Stir the thyme into the Panko.

Sea­son the pork lightly with salt and pep­per, then dip each piece into the flour, shak­ing off any ex­cess, and then into the milk, then the Panko, press­ing so that the bread crumbs ad­here to the pork. Place the breaded pork on a plate or wire rack.

Heat 2ta­ble­spoons of the oil in a large skil­let un­til hot. Cook the pork for about 3min­utes on each side un­til golden brown and just cooked through; you will prob- ably need to do this in at least two batches, adding more oil for the sec­ond batch as needed.

When the pieces of pork are cooked, place them briefly on a pa­per towel-lined plate to drain. Serve the pork with the Quick Pick­ley Cu­cum­ber Salad.

Nu­tri­tion in­for­ma­tion per serv­ing:

Quick Pick­ley Cu­cum­ber Salad: 29calo­ries; 0calo­ries from fat; 0g fat (0g sat­u­rated; 0g trans fats); 0mg choles­terol; 481mg sodium; 7 g car­bo­hy­drate; 2g fiber; 3g sugar; 2g pro­tein.

Pork Schnitzel: 362calo­ries; 197 calo­ries from fat; 22g fat (6g sat­u­rated; 0g trans fats); 68mg choles­terol; 596mg sodium; 14g car­bo­hy­drate; 1 g fiber; 1 g sugar; 26 g pro­tein.

SARAH E CROWDER VIA AP

Sch­nitzels are of­ten made with veal or chicken, but pork is a great al­ter­na­tive. Pound­ing out the cut­lets makes them even ten­derer and thin­ner, so they cook up quickly, per­fect for a week­night meal.

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