Speed bumps, paint­ing in the rain

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Robert,

Thank you for all of your in­sight.

I’m on the board of di­rec­tors for a gated com­mu­nity in the Santa Clarita Val­ley, and lately the high-speed traf­fic in our com­mu­nity has got­ten out of hand.

We re­cently had a child in­jured due to this speed, and we are look­ing to put in speed bumps now.

Are we sup­posed to fol­low the same rules as the city when in­stalling them or be­cause we are a pri­vate gated com­mu­nity, can we de­sign and des­ig­nate the place­ment and type of speed bumps that we feel best for our com­mu­nity?

We need to do this as soon as pos­si­ble, we want the chil­dren and fam­i­lies safe and to get this speed­ing un­der con­trol. What are the re­quire­ments for us?

Alvin M.

Alvin,

You are invit­ing both res­i­dents and oth­ers in the com­mu­nity to your as­so­ci­a­tion, so you will def­i­nitely be re­quired to in­stall sig­nage not­ing the speed bumps, and all cau­tion signs as­so­ci­ated with them.

The Los An­ge­les County Fire Depart­ment will need to be your first con­tact, you’ll have to get them ap­proved by the Fire Depart­ment first, due to emer­gency ser­vices and their ve­hi­cles, plus speed lim­i­ta­tions they’d also be re­stricted to for safety.

Once you have Fire Depart­ment ap­proval, you can move for­ward, but not­ing the above about sig­nage, as well as paint­ing of the speed bumps, so they are iden­ti­fi­able.

You’ll want to re­duce your home­own­ers as­so­ci­a­tion li­a­bil­ity for dam­ages as much as pos­si­ble, and this will in­clude you

The Los An­ge­les County Fire Depart­ment will need to be your first con­tact, you’ll have to get them ap­proved by the Fire Depart­ment first, due to emer­gency ser­vices and their ve­hi­cles, plus speed lim­i­ta­tions they’d also be re­stricted to for safety.

no­ti­fy­ing all res­i­dents and visi­tors at least 30 days prior to in­stall, that there will be traf­fic changes and that speed bumps will be in­stalled. This gives ev­ery­one ad­e­quate op­por­tu­nity to be fore­warned of the up­com­ing changes, and with the sig­nage that should go up ahead of the bumps, they are then fairly warned and can­not hold the HOA re­spon­si­ble for their ve­hi­cle dam­age.

Be sure to note the ef­fec­tive date on the signs, and send this via email to all own­ers, too. Pho­to­graph the be­fore and af­ter ar­eas and keep all progress doc­u­mented, es­pe­cially the no­ti­fi­ca­tions. You want to be able to show that you gave ad­e­quate no­ti­fi­ca­tions, so you’ve done the right thing.

Sign height is im­por­tant so be sure to do all of your home­work for each as­pect prior to com­mit­ting, and then you’ll have a safer neigh­bor­hood. You can al­ways put a call or visit in to the city of Santa Clarita’s Build­ing and Safety Depart­ment, staff there can also guide you on the steps to take.

Good luck,

Robert

Robert,

I’m part of a home­own­ers as­so­ci­a­tion here in Santa Clarita, and we want to start paint­ing our build­ings, but it’s get­ting a lit­tle late in the year with the pos­si­bil­ity of the rains com­ing. I’m told that it’s not a big deal to paint dur­ing the rains be­cause the paint used will be wa­ter-sol­u­ble.

I trust your judge­ment, what are your thoughts on this?

Mike

Mike,

I dis­agree. If you were to paint and rains soon fol­lowed, there is a con­di­tion called sur­fac­tant leach­ing. This con­di­tion is a con­cen­tra­tion of wa­ter-sol­u­ble paint in­gre­di­ents on the sur­face of la­tex paint. It can show up as tan, brown or clear spots or ar­eas, and can some­times be glossy, soapy, oily or sticky. The mois­ture in the air re­tards the cur­ing process, and al­lows the sur­fac­tants to sep­a­rate and rise to the sur­face. The rain that could ac­cu­mu­late on the sur­face of the freshly painted build­ing, and when it evap­o­rates, the residue is left be­hind and ends up be­ing un­sightly.

You could im­me­di­ately wash the ar­eas if this hap­pened, but it would not be a guar­an­teed fix; it would pos­si­bly need re­paint­ing. Any good quality paint job on a build­ing is go­ing to cost a de­cent amount of money, and you

Any good quality paint job on a build­ing is go­ing to cost a de­cent amount of money, and you cer­tainly don’t want to pay this twice.

cer­tainly don’t want to pay this twice so it would be my best rec­om­men­da­tion to not paint un­less you have suf­fi­cient good

weather to al­low a proper cure.

Check with your li­censed and in­sured paint­ing con­trac­tor, they’ll best be able to ad­vise you on the ap­pro­pri­ate tim­ing.

Here in the Santa Clarita Val­ley our win­dow of op­por­tu­nity is much longer than many other states, or even ar­eas of

Cal­i­for­nia, as the weather holds steady for so long.

You could likely get away with do­ing in in the next week or two if the weather out­look is good, but aside from that I’d per­son­ally play it safe and wait un­til the official “rainy sea­son” of Cal­i­for­nia is over.

Good luck on this project, Robert

Robert Lamoureux has 38 years of ex­pe­ri­ence as a gen­eral con­trac­tor, with sep­a­rate li­censes in elec­tri­cal and plumb­ing con­tract­ing. He owns IMS Con­struc­tion Inc. in Va­len­cia. His opin­ions are his own, not

nec­es­sar­ily those of The Sig­nal. Opin­ions ex­pressed in this col­umn are not meant to re­place the rec­om­men­da­tions of a qual­i­fied con­trac­tor af­ter that con­trac­tor has made a thor­ough vis­ual in­spec­tion. Email ques­tions to Robert at robert@im­scon­struc­tion.com.

Cour­tesy photo

Paint­ing dur­ing the rainy sea­son can lead to un­sightly residues and lead to pay­ing dou­ble the cost.

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