Fall is upon us, so it’s time to plant those trees Tree Talk

The Taos News - - HOME & GARDEN - Treesare­good.com/por­tals/0/docs/ treecare/New_TreePlant­ing.pdf) By Ki­neo Mem­mer Mem­mer se­nior at Taos High School, a mem­ber of the Taos Tree Board, and an in­tern at the Taos Land Trust. In­for­ma­tion for this ar­ti­cle was taken from “Why Tree Leaves Fall Bef

Septem­ber and Oc­to­ber are the prime time for fall plant­ing and pre­par­ing your trees for the win­ter months. If trees are not prop­erly taken care of over the win­ter, they can die or come back weak in the spring. Fall is a good time for plant­ing be­cause root gen­er­a­tion po­ten­tial is high due to the mod­er­ate to cool tem­per­a­tures. Air tem­per­a­tures are cooler then soil tem­per­a­tures in the fall, be­cause of the mois­ture and weather change, so trees can fo­cus their en­ergy on root growth rather than top growth.

Some trees that do bet­ter when planted in the fall in­clude alder, ash, buck­eye, crab ap­ple, honey lo­cust, lin­den, maple, sy­camore, pines and spruces. Not all trees do well in the fall, how­ever, so make sure that you plant your trees in con­di­tions that will help them to thrive.

When trans­plant­ing a young tree, fol­low these nine steps de­signed by the In­ter­na­tional So­ci­ety of Ar­bori­cul­ture to en­sure that your newly planted trees are healthy and happy:

(Com­plete plan avail­able at

1. Iden­tify the trunk flare (the area where the main roots at­tach to the tree trunk).

2. Dig a shal­low, broad plant­ing hole.

3. Re­move the con­tain­ers or cut away the wire bas­ket.

4. Place the tree at the proper height.

5. Straighten the tree in the hole.

6. Fill the hole gen­tly, but firmly.

7. Stake the tree, if nec­es­sary.

8. Mulch the base of the tree.

9. Pro­vide fol­low-up care. Fol­low-up care is the most im­por­tant part of plant­ing a new tree. To pre­vent trans­plant shock for your new trees, make sure that the tree has plenty, but not too much, wa­ter.

Mulching the tree is es­sen­tial for wa­ter and nu­tri­ent re­ten­tion. Use or­ganic ma­te­ri­als, such as leaves, shred­ded bark, peat moss, or wood chips. Cre­ate a ring of mulch about 6-12 inches away from the base of the tree, and do not ex­ceed a four-inch layer.

Some new trees may need mi­nor prun­ing af­ter they are trans­planted. How­ever, try to hold off on prun­ing un­til the tree has sur­vived for a full grow­ing sea­son in its new lo­ca­tion.

Win­ter care of trees is im­por­tant, espe­cially for younger trees. Fo­cus on younger trees first as they re­quire the most care over the win­ter months.

Make sure to pro­vide them with plenty of wa­ter once a month from De­cem­ber through Fe­bru­ary. Watch out for branches break­ing from snow or heavy winds. Last, wrap the trunks of thin-barked trees such as honey lo­cust, maple and lin­den to pre­vent bark dam­age in the win­ter.

You may have no­ticed that the trees are chang­ing col­ors ear­lier than usual this year but do not be alarmed. This early show­ing of fall color is sim­ply a re­ac­tion to the stress of the dry sum­mer.

Low mois­ture lev­els are caus­ing the trees to shut down early since they do not have the en­ergy to con­tinue sup­port­ing their fo­liage. The best thing you can do for your trees is to pro­vide them with plenty of wa­ter and nu­tri­ents to pre­pare them for the up­com­ing win­ter months.

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Paul Bryan Jones

Septem­ber and Oc­to­ber are the prime time for fall plant­ing and pre­par­ing your trees for the win­ter months. If trees are not prop­erly taken care of over the win­ter, they can die or come back weak in the spring.

Paul Bryan Jones

To pre­vent trans­plant shock for your new trees, make sure that the tree has plenty, but not too much, wa­ter. Mulching the tree is es­sen­tial for wa­ter and nu­tri­ent re­ten­tion.

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