CLAS­SIC RE­FIT

Yachting - - CONTENTS -

The re­fit of the 233-foot Haida 1929 cre­ated one of the most orig­i­nal char­ter yachts in the world.

Fol­low­ing her re­fit at Pen­den­nis, the 233-foot Haida 1929 is for char­ter with Ed­mis­ton, which also man­ages the 164-foot 1937 build Malahne.

“If you want a clas­sic yacht, there’s re­ally just those two, and Haida is sub­stan­tially larger,” says Ed­mis­ton bro­ker Alex Busher. adam lay had never seen any­thing like it. Not dur­ing the nearly eight years he spent work­ing for yacht de­signer John Mun­ford, and not since he opened his own stu­dio in Bri­tain in 2013. ¶ “This owner had spent a year be­fore he even bought the boat de­sign­ing what the in­te­rior was go­ing to be like,” Lay says. “He handed me three Ap­ple iBooks of ev­ery­thing that he wanted through the boat. He’d sorted it out and planned it all out. He’d sit in ho­tel rooms do­ing sketches.” ¶ Lay, work­ing for 18 months with a re­fit team of nearly 160 peo­ple plus an­other 20 to 30 crew at the Pen­den­nis yard in Fal­mouth, made the owner’s vi­sion a re­al­ity. The 233-foot Haida 1929 left the ship­yard this year and en­tered the char­ter mar­ket with Ed­mis­ton, mak­ing her what is ar­guably the most pres­ti­gious clas­sic yacht avail­able for book­ings to­day. ¶ Haida 1929 is ex­pected to cruise the Caribbean this win­ter on her orig­i­nal en­gines, which are be­lieved to be the old­est work­ing diesels of their type still in their orig­i­nal lo­ca­tion. Pen­den­nis had to re­build them with­out man­u­als or spare parts, as­sign­ing a team of eight peo­ple to the power plants alone. ¶ “We had to do things like re­build the gov­er­nors, which ran on old steam-en­gine prin­ci­ples,” says Mike Carr, Pen­den­nis man­ag­ing di­rec­tor. “It was re­ally in­ter­est­ing stuff. And we couldn’t get them out of the boat. Ev­ery­thing had to be done in the boat be­cause of the weight of the heavy steel cast­ings.” ¶ An­other ma­jor el­e­ment of the re­fit was adding a sun-deck spa tub. Parts of the su­per­struc­ture are wood, Carr says, and it does not of­fer the struc­tural in­tegrity re­quired for the ex­tra load. So, Pen­den­nis and Lay de­vised pil­lars that run down four decks, to the bilge, as a hid­den sup­port struc­ture. ¶ “They go through the owner’s bath­room, for in­stance, and they look like part of the dé­cor,” Lay says. “And in the li­brary, on the main deck, they run through the book­cases. We hid them be­hind books. And in the guest cabins, they dis­ap­peared into the cor­ners of the cabins. It was very dif­fi­cult to find those spa­ces.” ¶ The owner con­sid­ered even the small­est de­tails, Lay says, in­clud­ing the man­u­fac­tur­ers of gel fire­places that were

THE BOAT HAS A HIS­TORY AND A STORY. WHEN YOU’RE ON IT, YOU FEEL IT. THIS OWNER HAS TRIED TO KEEP AS MUCH OF THE ORIG­I­NAL­ITY AS POS­SI­BLE.

added to cre­ate an Old World am­bi­ence. ¶ “He wanted only Lora Piana fab­rics — he went to Mi­lan and sourced them him­self,” Lay says. “We re­ceived an en­ve­lope full of fab­rics that he’d cho­sen in the show­room.” ¶ The restora­tion makes Haida 1929 one of the most unique yachts avail­able for char­ter in the world. She has char­tered be­fore, in the early 1990s, ac­cord­ing to Alex Busher at Ed­mis­ton, but back then, she was not in the con­di­tion that guests will find her in now. ¶ “Con­sid­er­ing the pe­riod in which she was built, there are six very good cabins, all en suite with proper-size berths and head­room,” he says. “You have fire­places in the main sa­loon and on the owner’s deck — and the owner’s deck is com­pletely sep­a­rated. So, if you’re done with your guests, you can have that space up­stairs for a while. It’s like a very nice fam­ily home on the wa­ter.” ¶ Char­ter clients can ex­pe­ri­ence mo­ments aboard Haida 1929 that other yachts sim­ply can­not of­fer, he says. ¶ “Yes, you have the cinema, but there’s no flat-screen TVs any­where,” he says. “You see book­shelves and games. It’s go­ing back to a pe­riod when fam­i­lies spent time to­gether.” ¶ Those are the types of mo­ments the owner en­joys and wants to share, mak­ing a char­ter aboard Haida 1929 akin to en­ter­ing an­other era. ¶ “We made the flow of the ves­sel more in keep­ing with his vi­sion of walk­ing around the decks arm-in-arm with his wife and a glass of cham­pagne,” Lay says, “and come in­side and find a roar­ing fire­place and have a place for smok­ing a ci­gar with the boys.”

HE WANTED THAT AT­MOS­PHERE OF FEEL­ING AT HOME, OP­U­LENCE THAT WASN’T IN YOUR FACE, OVER­THE-TOP.

Af­ter some 300 re­fits in 30 years, Pen­den­nis says Haida 1929 is one of its best.

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