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The Manica Post - - Comment & Feedback -

I WANT to say Happy Birth­day to our mother, Dr Amai Grace Mu­gabe for turn­ing 52 years. May God con­tinue to give her many more years filled with good health. In Man­i­ca­land, we are proud of you Amai. We love you.— Ter­rence Mwedzi.

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New in­no­va­tions every time has been the trend of Zim­pa­pers. We thank you for in­tro­duc­ing the new-look Her­ald East­ern edi­tion. The pa­per is ex­cel­lent and re­fresh­ing. The Mutare Bureau is com­ing up with well writ­ten and fac­tual news. Ev­ery­day I am en­joy­ing the new baby. With Gindimukindi raWasu along­side, Man­i­ca­land will never be the same. — Tawanda Mh­langa, Dangamvura.

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In­stead of build­ing on the mo­men­tum after win­ning the COSAFA Cas­tle Cup, the War­riors chose to slide from the top to the bot­tom by giv­ing op­po­nents the edge to up­stage us. While many blame the goal­keeper for miss­ing the penalty while he was an `ab­sent’ goal­keeper be­tween the posts, the team failed to bury the Brave War­riors de­spite a goal lead. Namibia booted us, not out of luck, but de­served vic­tory.— Richard Chauke.

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Metro Peach and Browne’s Chipinge branch is de­priv­ing cus­tomers by us­ing Eco­cash agent code when buy­ing in­stead of a mer­chant code. This is not fair since we are in­cur­ring high cost at the ex­pense of their profit.- Con­cerned cus­tomer.

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Min­is­ter of Health and his Home Af­fairs coun­ter­part should work hand in hand to raise health funds. One way is round­ing up sex work­ers, fine them and share the pro­ceeds. The health fund will ben­e­fit from fi­nan­cial re­sources sourced from those who com­pro­mise good health of the na­tion. Tobacco, al­co­hol and spir­its must be levied.— Crispen Tendai Masenhu.

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How can Ts­van­gi­rai lead Zim­babwe when he called for sanc­tions in-or­der for Zim­bab­weans to suf­fer? He is also suf­fer­ing from can­cer and I have no doubt that when elected into of­fice, he will squan­der tax­pay­ers’ money while get­ting treat­ment abroad.— Icho.

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As Zim­bab­weans, we should learn to love each other re­gard­less of po­lit­i­cal af­fil­i­a­tion. If we do so, we will start see­ing a change in this coun­try in terms of devel­op­ment. Our big­gest aim is to move for­ward and not back­wards. I de­test trib­al­ism be­cause I re­gard it as a bar­baric thing. It is time to walk the talk. Let us all value our na­tion.— Mwedzi.

**** Ac­cord­ing to our cus­toms, for falsely call­ing some­one a witch, you com­pen­sate with a beast. Sim­i­larly, it is a crim­i­nal of­fence to call some­one a witch or wizard. The Nyanyadzi com­mu­nity hired its divine `snipers’ and cleared the teach­ers ac­cused of Satanism. They passed the test and are clean like pins. We don’t have such a sub­ject in our schools. It is pay­back time. You do not hate other peo­ple to call them witches or wizards. Peo­ple should learn to sweep their yards with­out wor­ry­ing other peo­ple. Sim­ply deal with your prob­lems with­out drag­ging oth­ers in the mess. The ob­ses­sion in Satanism, what­ever it is, is as­tound­ing and the un­der­world prac­tice was smug­gled into the coun­try, per­haps by th­ese trick­sters called mir­a­cle prophets. Satanism is an act of evil and to tor­ment some­one as a witch or wizard, equally falls in the said cat­e­gory.— Mahuhushe.

**** Road­blocks are part of polic­ing the world over. How­ever, the rea­son why peo­ple are com­plain­ing about them is that there are now nu­mer­ous. For the mo­tor­ing pub­lic, there is no dif­fer­ence be­tween the spot checks and road­blocks. The be­hav­iour of some of the of­fi­cers at the road­blocks is just rough. You are treated like a crim­i­nal for not fas­ten­ing a seat belt. The sit­u­a­tion be­comes worse when you do not have a spot fine. Some of­fi­cers have be­come the law unto them­selves, do­ing the op­po­site of what the ser­vice char­ter says. We do not hate our po­lice, but th­ese is­sues need to be ad­dressed. Mind you, we are the pub­lic and you serve us. — Tawanda Mh­langa.

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Peo­ple tend to think be­ing of a dif­fer­ent po­lit­i­cal af­fil­i­a­tion is the key to hos­til­ity. We need to learn to work to­gether. Pol­i­tics is re­garded as a game just like foot­ball. Some­one is de­ter­mined and des­tined to win. There must be no di­vi­sions and ag­gres­sion cre­ated as a re­sult of pol­i­tics and party for­ma­tions. A peace­ful na­tion has pros­per­ity and vast eco­nom­i­cal growth. Dif­fer­ences within a na­tion and its peo­ple need to be wiped and buried for a to­tal di­ver­si­fied econ­omy. Peo­ple must come to the idea of lov­ing one an­other with dig­nity and re­spect. A godly kind of love must pre­vail within peo­ple’s hearts and minds. Sakubva must be the cen­tre of love and pas­sion to pros­per. Youths must bear in mind that work­ing to­gether is the only way a na­tion can achieve its man­date. — Zondi, NHB, Sakubva.

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War­riors’ goal­keeper played vil­lain by miss­ing the penalty kick. His at­tempts to stop the penal­ties were am­a­teur­ish, go­ing the wrong way to soft penal­ties. Pet­ros Mhari must have ag­o­nised. — CTM

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The ma­jor­ity of school chil­dren foot from home to school. The Min­istry of Pri­mary and Sec­ondary Ed­u­ca­tion should be grate­ful to the many preschools that have mush­roomed. It is not fea­si­ble and pos­si­ble that the un­der five of age kids can walk long dis­tances to school. Th­ese pre-schools have closed the gap. Pri­mary schools are un­der­staffed to have all th­ese kids and equally fall short of pre-school re­quire­ments. Thus, the di­rec­tive to par­ents that it will be our fault send­ing our chil­dren to un­reg­is­tered pre-schools is to nail the com­plainant to free the ac­cused. Ac­tu­ally, it is the re­spon­si­bil­ity of the min­istry to en­gage th­ese pre-schools to make sure that they are reg­is­tered and mon­i­tored, than tell us that our in­no­cent chil­dren from th­ese pre-schools will not be en­rolled to start Grade One. Make af­ford­able min­i­mum re­quire­ments to reg­is­ter a pre-school than the lux­ury put for­ward to get reg­is­tered. — Ob­server.

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