AF­TER 5

SIP­PING AT A GLASS WHILE NIB­BLING SIM­PLE BITES CAN TRANS­FORM PREPA­RA­TION INTO A PLEAS­ANT TIME TO RE­LAX AF­TER A DAY AT WORK.

Food & Drink - - DRINK - BY JAMES CHATTO RECIPES BY AMY ROSEN PHO­TOG­RA­PHY BY JAMES TSE

The best tra­di­tions are those that in­volve a mea­sure of self-in­dul­gence. Hence the en­dur­ing pop­u­lar­ity of the Que­bec rit­ual of cinq à sept, the cou­ple of hours be­tween the end of the work­ing day and din­ner when one can re­lax, maybe meet up with a friend, have a drink and a lit­tle some­thing to eat and en­joy a good con­ver­sa­tion. If you work in an of­fice, this prob­a­bly takes place in a café or bar. But if you work from home, as my wife and I do, it’s eas­ier just to ren­dezvous in the kitchen. There we put to­gether a small snack, pour our­selves a glass of wine or some other aper­i­tif and start to un­wind. It’s a high­light of the day. Here, as both illustration and in­spi­ra­tion, are a few ideas for cre­at­ing just such a do­mes­tic cinq à sept, with four sim­ple but de­li­cious recipes matched to some favourite drinks.

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