The new easy

HOW TO EAT WELL , SPEND LESS & MAKE TIME FOR FAM­ILY

Woolworths TASTE - - Front Page -

3 Old-world toma­toes

If you’re one of the ur­ban South Africans who eats 12 kg of toma­toes per year, you re­ally should be branch­ing out from the stan­dard va­ri­eties. Come on, now. The global trend to­wards eat­ing “heir­loom” va­ri­eties of veg­eta­bles and fruit (pro­duce that is nat­u­rally pol­li­nated from seeds handed down by gen­er­a­tions) is catch­ing on lo­cally. The ben­e­fits? Var­ied flavours, tex­tures shapes and colours that are all at their best eaten raw, obvs. Serv­ing sug­ges­tion? Noth­ing says sum­mer like Abi’s mixed plat­ter of ripe Woolies toma­toes with white-flesh nec­tarines, fior di latte moz­zarella torn into chunks and sim­ply dressed with ex­tra vri­gin olive oil, red wine vine­gar, chopped Ital­ian pars­ley, lime zest and smoked Mal­don salt. We love it so much it made the cover.

4 Nigella seeds

Stand aside sesame! These tiny black seeds have a slightly bit­ter flavour with some of the pun­gency of onion, which will en­hance sweeter veg­gies such as car­rots. Serv­ing sug­ges­tion? Sprin­kle over toma­toes or egg and cheese dishes, or use the seeds to make sweet-savoury shards to dec­o­rate cakes and desserts. Pair Nigella seeds with ruby choco­late, the on-trend new va­ri­ety made from ruby co­coa beans in­tro­duced last year by co­coa com­pany Barry Calle­baut (find it at My Sugar in Cape Town and Cho­coloza in Joburg).

5 Tem­peh

Like tofu, tem­peh is made from soya beans, but con­sists of whole beans (rather than an ex­tract of the ground beans) fer­mented to form a dense block that’s firm in tex­ture and earthy in flavour. If you’re a plant-based be­liever, add it to your pantry arse­nal, pronto. Serv­ing sug­ges­tion?

Try it mar­i­nated and fried in gochu­jang, the spicy Korean fer­mented red chilli paste, then dipped into an ad­dic­tive ve­gan sea­weed aïoli.

6 Bone broth

It’s not new, but bone broth made head­lines in the last decade thanks to the paleo diet and con­tin­ues to in­spire con­verts. How is it dif­fer­ent to stock? Bone broth needs long, slow cook­ing to ex­tract ge­latin and min­er­als from the bones. You can help the process along by roast­ing the bones first with a good-qual­ity ap­ple cider vine­gar (un­fil­tered), which is also hav­ing a mo­ment thanks to the on­go­ing pop­u­lar­ity of fer­mented foods. Two trends for the price of one.

7 Katsu

This is the 2019 ver­sion of the chicken mayo sand­wich: chicken breasts in a crust of crushed corn­flakes, served on white bread with Ja­panese mayo. Our ver­sion is in­spired by katsu, a fried chicken cut­let made with panko crumbs that orig­i­nated in Tokyo. Sim­i­lar to a schnitzel, it’s clas­sic Ja­panese com­fort food that’s now pop­u­lar around the world.

Add sriracha mayo for a DIY fast-food win­ner.

8 Shave ice

Dairy-free, ve­gan and with no added sugar, this Ja­panese-de­rived dessert trend, which is made by shav­ing, not crush­ing, a block of ice un­til very fine so that it ab­sorbs flavoured syrups, is be­ing called the new granita. In Japan, kakig­ori is a tra­di­tional sum­mer dessert of shave ice made with a fruit-flavoured syrup and some­times mochi, con­densed milk or adzuki beans. With flavours rang­ing from co­conut and rasp­berry to granadilla and pineap­ple it makes a re­fresh­ing dessert or – yes! – a frozen cock­tail.

9 Vi­o­let

You’ll see this pur­ple-blue flower crop­ping up lib­er­ally on restau­rant menus this year. In­ter­na­tion­ally, chefs are pair­ing vi­o­let mus­tard with duck, as well as us­ing it in cock­tails. At Coobs in Parkhurst, Jesse Chinn uses can­died vi­o­lets in a drink called The Avi­a­tor. Their sub­tle flavour makes these flow­ers great for gar­nish­ing sal­ads and mak­ing vi­o­let sugar (layer the flow­ers in a jar of caster sugar to in­fuse). Serv­ing sug­ges­tion?

The del­i­cate sweet­ness of vi­o­lets is a per­fect match for the tang of strained yo­ghurts like labneh.

See page 115 for more on how to make your own yo­ghurt or look out for Woolies’ new strained yo­ghurts, in­clud­ing labneh.

10 Date paste

Noth­ing lends nat­u­ral sweet­ness to smooth­ies, bakes or break­fast oats like fresh dates. Max­imise their tof­fee-like flavour by mak­ing a smooth paste (a.k.a. the new nut but­ter) to use as a frost­ing for cakes or in ve­gan brown­ies. Serv­ing

sug­ges­tion? Com­ple­ment the sweet­ness of date paste with a sprin­kling of popped red and white quinoa – sim­ply dry fry these seeds in a hot pan to bring out their nutty flavour.

NIGELLA SEED AND RUBY CHOCO­LATESHARDSABI’S LAZY CAP­RESE SALADBAKED CHICKEN BONE BROTH WITH AP­PLE CIDER VINE­GAR

KOREAN TEM­PEH WITH SEA­WEED AQUAFABA AÏOLI

KATSU CORNFLAKE CHICKEN SAND­WICH

RASPBERRYGRANADILLA SHAVEICE SNOW CONE VE­GAN DATE BUT­TER AND POPPED QUINOAVI­O­LET LABNEH

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